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RESEARCH PAPERS

Corrosion of Feedwater Heater Tubing Alloys in Peaking Service

[+] Author and Article Information
G. C. Wiedersum

Mechanical Research Section, Engineering and Research Department, Philadelphia Electric Co., Philadelphia, Pa.

E. A. Tice

Corrosion Engineering Section, Development and Research Dept., The International Nickel Co., Inc., New York, N. Y.

J. Eng. Power 87(3), 324-328 (Jul 01, 1965) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3678268 History: Received July 31, 1964; Online January 10, 2012

Abstract

A pilot-sized heat exchanger, containing a variety of alloy tubes, has been operated under peaking conditions for almost three years in parallel with a feedwater heater in a generating station. This test had three objectives: (1) To produce “exfoliation” scaling on commercial 70-30 copper-nickel tubes such as had occurred in commercial feedwater heaters at this and other stations under peaking conditions, (2) to evaluate modifications of the 70-30 copper-nickel alloy, and (3) to evaluate a number of other alloys. Under the test conditions, the formation of exfoliation scaling was characteristic of and limited to the 70-30 copper-nickel alloy. Exfoliation scaling was not prevented by the addition of 1.5 percent aluminum to the alloy but the addition of 5 percent iron prevented it. Other resistant alloys are 90-10, 80-20, and 60-40 copper nickels, MONEL1 alloy 400, Nickel 200, INCONEL1 alloy 600, stainless steels, and titanium. Carbon steel and a low-alloy steel developed adherent iron oxide coatings with only minor pitting attack. Condensate side surfaces (inside of tubes) also were examined after testing and their condition is described.

Copyright © 1965 by ASME
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