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RESEARCH PAPERS

A Magnetic Damper for First-Mode Vibration Reduction in Multimass Flexible Rotors

[+] Author and Article Information
M. E. F. Kasarda

Rotor Bearing Dynamics, Inc., Wellsville, NY 14895

P. E. Allaire, R. R. Humphris, L. E. Barrett

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22901

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 112(4), 463-469 (Oct 01, 1990) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2906190 History: Received February 01, 1989; Online April 24, 2008

Abstract

Many rotating machines such as compressors, turbines, and pumps have long thin shafts with resulting vibration problems. They would benefit from additional damping near the center of the shaft. Magnetic dampers have the potential to be employed in these machines because they can operate in the working fluid environment, unlike conventional bearings. This paper describes an experimental test rig that was set up with a long thin shaft and several masses to represent a flexible shaft machine. An active magnetic damper was placed in three locations: near the midspan, near one end disk, and close to the bearing. With typical control parameter settings, the midspan location reduced the first mode vibration 82 percent, the disk location reduced it 75 percent, and the bearing location attained a 74 percent reduction. Magnetic damper stiffness and damping values used to obtain these reductions were only a few percent of the bearing stiffness and damping values. A theoretical model of both the rotor and the damper was developed and compared to the measured results. The agreement was good.

Copyright © 1990 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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