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RESEARCH PAPERS: Gas Turbines: Controls and Diagnostics

High Temperature Silicon Integrated Circuits and Passive Components for Commercial and Military Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
R. R. Grzybowski

United Technologies Research Center, 411 Silver Lane, MS 129-32, East Hartford, CT 06108

B. Gingrich

Honeywell Solid State Electronics Center, 12001 State Hwy. 55, Plymouth, MN 55441

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 121(4), 622-628 (Oct 01, 1999) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2818517 History: Received February 21, 1998; Revised June 23, 1999; Online December 03, 2007

Abstract

Advances in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integrated circuit technology and the steady development of wider band gap semiconductors like silicon carbide are enabling the practical deployment of high temperature electronics. High temperature civilian and military electronics applications include distributed controls for aircraft, automotive electronics, electric vehicles and instrumentation for geothermal wells, oil well logging, and nuclear reactors. While integrated circuits are key to the realization of complete high temperature electronic systems, passive components including resistors, capacitors, magnetics, and crystals are also required. This paper will present characterization data obtained from a number of silicon high temperature integrated evaluated over a range of elevated temperatures and aged at a selected high temperature. This paper will also present a representative cross section of high temperature passive component characterization data for device types needed by many applications. Device types represented will include both small signal and power resistors and capacitors. Specific problems encountered with the employment of these devices in harsh environments will be discussed for each family of components. The goal in presenting this information is to demonstrate the viability of a significant number of commercially available silicon integrated circuits and passive components that operate at elevated temperatures as well as to encourage component suppliers to continue to optimize a selection of their product offerings for operation at higher temperatures. In addition, systems designers will be encouraged to view this information with an eye towards the conception and implementation of reliable and affordable high temperature systems.

Copyright © 1999 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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