0
Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Fuel Property Effects on PCCI Combustion in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
Cosmin E. Dumitrescu1

Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology,  National Research Council, Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6, Canadacosmin.dumitrescu@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

W. Stuart Neill

Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology,  National Research Council, Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6, Canadastuart.neill@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

Hongsheng Guo, Vahid Hosseini, Wallace L. Chippior

Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology,  National Research Council, Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6, Canada

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 134(5), 052801 (Feb 21, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005213 History: Received February 22, 2011; Accepted September 08, 2011; Published February 21, 2012; Online February 21, 2012

An experimental study was performed to investigate fuel property effects on premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion in a heavy-duty diesel engine. A matrix of research diesel fuels designed by the Coordinating Research Council, referred to as the Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE), was used. The fuel matrix design covers a wide range of cetane numbers (30 to 55), 90% distillation temperatures (270 to 340 °C) and aromatics content (20 to 45%). The fuels were tested in a single-cylinder Caterpillar diesel engine equipped with a common-rail fuel injection system. The engine was operated at 900 rpm, a relative air/fuel ratio of 1.2 and 60% exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for all fuels. The study was limited to a single fuel injection event starting between −30° and 0 °CA after top dead center (aTDC) with a rail pressure of 150 MPa. The brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) ranged from 2.6 to 3.1 bar depending on the fuel and its injection timing. The experimental results show that cetane number was the most important fuel property affecting PCCI combustion behavior. The low cetane number fuels had better brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) due to more optimized combustion phasing and shorter combustion duration. They also had a longer ignition delay period available for premixing, which led to near-zero soot emissions. The two fuels with high cetane number and high 90% distillation temperature produced significant soot emissions. The two fuels with high cetane number and high aromatics produced the highest brake specific NOx emissions, although the absolute values were below 0.1 g/kW-h. Brake specific HC and CO emissions were primarily a function of the combustion phasing, but the low cetane number fuels had slightly higher HC and lower CO emissions than the high cetane number fuels.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Caterpillar 3401 E engine

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

CRC FACE fuel matrix

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Distillation curves of CRC FACE fuels

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Influence of start of injection timing on BMEP

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Influence of start of injection timing on (a) cylinder pressure; and (b) net rate of heat release for FACE fuel #9

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Effect of start of injection timing on combustion phasing (CA50)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Effect of start of injection timing on standard deviation of combustion phasing (CA50)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Effect of start of injection timing on ignition delay

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Relationship between combustion phasing (CA50) and start of combustion (CA05)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Effect of combustion phasing on combustion duration (CA90-CA05)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Effect of cetane number on net rate of heat release for FACE fuels #1 and #5

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Effect of combustion phasing on brake specific NOx emissions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Effect of combustion phasing on brake specific soot emissions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Effect of combustion phasing on brake specific CO emissions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Effect of combustion phasing on brake specific HC emissions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Effect of combustion phasing on combustion efficiency

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Effect of combustion phasing on brake specific fuel consumption

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 18

Lowest BSFC for each FACE fuel with near-zero soot and NOx emissions

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In