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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Gas Turbines: Combustion and Fuel

Multicomponent and High-Pressure Effects on Droplet Vaporization

[+] Author and Article Information
S. K. Aggarwal

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607

H. C. Mongia

GE Aircraft Engines, Cincinnati, OH 45215

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 124(2), 248-255 (Mar 26, 2002) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1423640 History: Received October 01, 2000; Revised March 01, 2001; Online March 26, 2002
Copyright © 2002 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Temporal histories of droplet surface area (nondimensional) and temperature for a bicomponent (n-C10H22 and n-C14H30) and an equivalent single-component (n-C12H26) fuel droplet. Predictions of infinite-diffusion and diffusion-limit models are shown in Figs. 1(a) and 1(b), respectively. Ambient temperature=1500 K,pressure=1 atm, and initial droplet diameter and temperature are 100 μm and 300 K, respectively.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of total vaporization rates (nondimensional) for a bicomponent and an equivalent single-component fuel droplet predicted using the infinite-diffusion and diffusion-limit models for the conditions of Fig. 1
Grahic Jump Location
Temporal histories of droplet surface area (nondimensional) and temperature for a bicomponent (n-C10H22 and n-C14H30) and an equivalent single-component (n-C12H26) fuel droplet. Predictions of infinite-diffusion and diffusion-limit models are shown in Figs. 3(a) and 3(b), respectively. Ambient temperature=373 K,pressure=1 atm, and initial droplet temperature=233 K.
Grahic Jump Location
Total vaporization rates (nondimensional) for a bicomponent and an equivalent single-component fuel droplet predicted using the infinite-diffusion and diffusion-limit models. Initial droplet diameter is 100 μm for Fig. 4(a) and 30 μm for Fig. 4(b). Other conditions are the same as those in Fig. 3.
Grahic Jump Location
Temporal variation of droplet surface area (nondimensional) for a bicomponent (n-C10H22 and n-C14H30) and an equivalent single-component (n-C12H26) fuel droplet for pressure of 1 atm (Fig. 5(a)) and 15 atm (Fig. 5(b)). Predictions of the infinite-diffusion and diffusion-limit models are shown. The gas temperature is 1500 K, and initial droplet diameter is 100 μm.
Grahic Jump Location
Temporal variation of droplet surface temperature for a bicomponent and an equivalent single-component fuel droplet for the conditions of Fig. 5
Grahic Jump Location
Pressure-mole fraction diagram for nitrogen/n-heptane mixtures, calculated using the Peng-Robinson equation of state. Experimental data from Ref. 24 at 305 K and 400 K are also shown.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of the predicted and measured (n-heptane) droplet velocity and nondimensional surface area along the trajectory for three different ambient pressures. Ambient temperature is 550 K and initial droplet diameter is 780 μm.

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