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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Numerical Characterization of Aerodynamic Losses of Jet Arrays for Gas Turbine Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Antonio Andreini

Energy Engineering Department, “S.Stecco,”  University of Florence, 50139, via S.Marta 3, Florence, Italy

Riccardo Da Soghe

Energy Engineering Department, “S.Stecco,”  University of Florence, 50139, via S.Marta 3, Florence, Italyriccardo.dasoghe@htc.de.unifi.it

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 134(5), 052504 (Feb 29, 2012) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005216 History: Received May 02, 2011; Accepted May 03, 2011; Published February 29, 2012; Online February 29, 2012

Jet array is an arrangement typically used to cool several gas turbine parts. Some examples of such applications can be found in the impingement cooled region of gas turbine airfoils or in the turbine blade tip clearances control of large aero-engines. In order to correctly evaluate the impinging jet mass flow rate, the characterization of holes discharge coefficient is a compulsory activity. In this work, an aerodynamic analysis of jet arrays for active clearance control was performed; the aim was the definition of a correlation for the discharge coefficient (Cd ) of a generic hole of the array. The data were taken from a set of CFD RANS simulations, in which the behavior of the cooling system was investigated over a wide range of fluid-dynamics conditions. Furthermore, several different holes arrangements were investigated in significant detail, with the aim of evaluating the influence of the hole spacing on the discharge coefficient distribution. Tests were conducted by varying the jet Reynolds number in a wide range of effective engine operative conditions (Re = 2000-12,000, Pressure- Ratio = 1.01-1.6). To point out the reliability of the CFD analysis, some comparisons with experimental data, measured at the Department of Energy Engineering of the University of Florence, were drawn. An in-depth analysis of the numerical data set has underlined the opportunity of an efficient reduction through the mass velocity ratio of hole and feeding pipe: the dependence of the discharge coefficients from this parameter is roughly logarithmic.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Tested geometries

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Numerical domain

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Geometry A standard grid

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Geometry A refined grid

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Figure 5

CFD mesh sensitivity: Geometry A mass flow rate split in case of β = 1.12

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Figure 6

Comparison between CFD and experimental results in terms of man ifold centerline pressure distribution

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Figure 7

Discharge coefficient distribution: Geometry D, E, F β = 1.1

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Figure 8

Discharge coefficient distribution: Geometry A

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Figure 9

MVR parameter distribution: Geometry A

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Figure 10

Discharge coefficient over MVR parameter distribution: Geometry A

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Figure 11

Discharge coefficient over MVR parameter distribution: Geometry B, H, I

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Figure 12

Cd * over MVR parameter distribution: Case A, α = 0.19

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Figure 13

Cd * over MVR parameter distribution: Whole CFD data set (i.e., all geometries and related operating conditions

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Figure 14

Cd * over MVR parameter distribution: Comparison among correla tion prediction and whole CFD data set (i.e., all geometries and related operating conditions

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Figure 15

MVR parameter distribution: several geometries and boundary conditions

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