0
TECHNICAL PAPERS: Internal Combustion Engines

Applying the Representative Interactive Flamelet Model to Evaluate the Potential Effect of Wall Heat Transfer on Soot Emissions in a Small-Bore Direct-Injection Diesel Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
C. Hergart

Diesel Powertrain Systems, Ford Research Center Aachen, Süsterfeldstrasse 200, 52072 Aachen, Germany

N. Peters

Institut für Technische Mechanik, Rheinisch-Westfählische Technische Hochschule, Templegraben 64, 52062 Aachen, Germanye-mail: n.peters@itm.rwth-aachen.de

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 124(4), 1042-1052 (Sep 24, 2002) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1473147 History: Received May 01, 2001; Revised November 01, 2001; Online September 24, 2002
Copyright © 2002 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Peters, N., Müller, U. C., Pitsch, H., and Wan, Y. P., 1995, “Modellierung der Schadstoffbildung bei der dieselmotorischen Verbrennung,” 5th Symposium: The Working Process of the Internal Combustion Engine, Graz, Austria, Sept., pp. 51–67.
Peters,  N., 1984, “Laminar Diffusion Flamelet Models in Non-Premixed Turbulent Combustion,” Prog. Energy Combust. Sci., 10, pp. 319–339.
Hasse, C., Barths, H., and Peters, N., 1999, “Modeling the Effect of Split Injection in Diesel Engines Using Representative Interactive Flamelets,” SAE Technical Paper 1990-01-3547.
Pitsch, H., Barths, H., and Peters, N., 1996, “Three-Dimensional Modeling of NOx and Soot Formation in DI Diesel Engines Using Detailed Chemistry Based on the Interactive Flamelet Approach,” SAE Technical Paper 962057.
Barths, H., Pitsch, H., and Peters, N., 1997, “Comparison of the Representative Interactive Flamelet Model and the Magnussen Model for Combustion and Pollutant Formation in DI Diesel Engine to Experiments,” Proceedings of the third International Conference on High Performance Computing in the Automotive Industry, M. Sheh, ed.
Hergart, C., Barths, H., and Peters, N., 1999, “Modeling the Combustion Process in a Small-Bore Diesel Engine Using a Model Based on Representative Interactive Flamelets,” SAE Technical Paper 1999-01-3550.
Schwarz, V., König, G., Dittrich, P., and Binder, K., 1999, “Analysis of Mixture Formation, Combustion and Pollutant Formation in HD Diesel Engines using Modern Optical Diagnostics and Numerical Simulation,” SAE Technical Paper 1999-01-3647.
Miles, P. C., “The Influence of Swirl on HSDI Diesel Combustion at Moderate Speed and Load,” SAE Technical Paper 2000-01-1829.
Pitsch, H., 1998, “Modellierung der Zündung und Schadstoffbildung bei der dieselmotorischen Verbrennung mit Hilfe eines interaktiven Flamelet-Modells,” Ph.D. thesis, Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule, Institut für Technische Mechanik, Feb.
Pitsch,  H., and Peters,  N., 1998, “A Consistent Formulation for Non-Premixed Combustion Considering Differential Diffusion Effects,” Combust. Flame, 114, pp. 26–40.
Hubbard,  G. L., and Tien,  C. L., 1978, “Infrared Mean Absorption Coefficient of Luminous Flames and Smoke,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 100, pp. 235–239.
Müller, U. C., 1989, “Der Einflußvon Strahlungsverlusten auf die thermische NO-Bildung in laminaren CO—H2-Diffusionsflammen,” Diploma thesis, RWTH Aachen.
Hergart, C., 2001, “Modeling Combustion and Soot Emissions in a Small-Bore Direct-Injection Diesel Engine,” Ph.D. thesis, Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule, Institut für Technische Mechanik.
Jones,  W. P., and Whitelaw,  J. H., 1982, “Calculation Methods for Turbulent Flows: A Review,” Combust. Flame, 48, p. 1.
Amsden, A. A., O’Rourke, P. J., and Butler, T. D., “KIVA-II: A Computer Program for Chemically Reactive Flows With Sprays,” Los Alamos National Labs., U.S.A.
Amsden, A. A., “A KIVA Program with Block-Structured Mesh for Complex Geometries,” Los Alamos National Labs., U.S.A.
Amsden, A. A., “A Block-Structured KIVA Program for Engines with Vertical or Canted Valves,” Los Alamos National Labs., U.S.A.
Amsden, A. A., “KIVA-3V, Release 2, Improvements to KIVA-3V,” Los Alamos National Labs., U.S.A.
Barths, H., Hasse, C., Bikas, G., and Peters, N., 2000, “Simulation of Combustion in DI Diesel Engines Using an Eulerian Particle Flamelet Model,” Twenty-Eighth Symposium (International) on Combustion, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh, submitted for publication.
Girimaji,  S. S., 1991, “Assumed β-pdf Model for Turbulent Mixing: Validation and Extension to Multiple Scalar Mixing,” Combust. Sci. Technol., 78, p. 177.
Baulch,  D. L., Cobos,  C. J., Cox,  R. A., Frank,  P., Hayman,  Th. Just, Kerr,  J. A., Murrells,  T., Pilling,  M. J., Troe,  J., Walker,  R. W., and Warnatz,  J., 1992, “Evaluated Kinetic Data for Combustion Modelling,” J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, 21, pp. 411–429.
Benson,  S. W., 1981, Prog. Energy Combust. Sci., 7, pp. 125–134.
Chevalier, C., Pitz, W. J., Warnatz, J., Westbrook, C. K., and Melenk, H., 1992, “Hydrocarbon Ignition: Automatic Generation of Reaction Mechanisms and Application to Modeling of Engine Knock,” Twenty-Fourth Symposium (International) on Combustion, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, pp. 93–101.
Shaddix, C. R., Brezinsky, K., and Glassman, I., 1992, “Oxidation of 1-Methylnaphthalene,” Twenty-Fourth Symposium (International) on Combustion, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, pp. 683–690.
Emdee,  C. R., Brezinsky,  K., and Glassman,  I., 1992, “A Kinetic Model for the Oxidation of Toluene Near 1200 K,” J. Phys. Chem., 96, pp. 2151–2161.
Pitsch, H., and Peters, N., 1995, “Reduced Kinetics of Multicomponent Fuels to Describe the Auto-Ignition, Flame Propagation and Post Flame Oxidation of Gasoline and Diesel Fuels,” Periodic Report, project FK.2, IDEA-EFFECT, 6th period 01.07.95-31.12.95.
Hewson, J. C., and Bollig, M., 1996, “Reduced Mechanisms for NOx Emissions From Hydrocarbon Diffusion Flames,” Twenty-Sixth Symposium (International) on Combustion, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh, PA.
Frenklach,  M., and Warnatz,  J., 1987, “Detailed Modeling of PAH Profiles in a Sooting Low-Pressure Acetylene Flame,” Combust. Sci. Technol., 51, p. 265.
Miller,  J. A., and Melius,  C. F., 1992, “Kinetic and Thermodynamic Issues in the Formation of Aromatic Compounds in Flames of Aliphatic Fuels,” Combust. Flame, 91, pp. 21–39.
Frenklach,  M., 1985, Chem. Eng. Sci., 40(10), pp. 1843–1849.
Frenklach,  M., and Harris,  S. J., 1987, J. Colloid Interface Sci., 118, pp. 252–261.
Mauß, F., 1998, “Entwicklung eines kinetischen Modells der Rußbildung mit schneller Polymerization,” Ph.D. thesis, Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule, Institut für Technische Mechanik, Feb.
Barths,  H., Pitsch,  H., and Peters,  N., 1999, “Three-Dimensional Simulation of DI Diesel Combustion and Pollutant Formation Using a Two-Component Reference Fuel,” Oil Gas Sci. Technol., 54, pp. 233–244.
Muntean, G. G., 1999, “A Theoretical Model for the Correlation of Smoke Number to Dry Particulate Concentration in Diesel Exhaust,” SAE Technical Paper 1999-01-0515.
Dec, J. E., and Tree, A. R., 2001, “Diffusion-Flame/Wall Interactions in a Heavy-Duty DI Diesel Engine,” SAE Technical Paper 2001-01-1295.
Peters, N., 2000, Turbulent Combustion, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.
Peters, N., and Janicka, J., 1982, “Prediction of Turbulent Jet Diffusion Flame Lift-Off Using a PDF Transport Equation,” Nineteenth Symposium (International) on Combustion, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, pp. 367–374.
Girimaji,  S. S., 1992, “On the Modelling of Scalar Diffusion in Isotropic Turbulence,” Phys. Fluids, 11, Nov., pp. 2529–2537.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Interaction between flamelet code and CFD code
Grahic Jump Location
Soot source terms as a function of engine crank angle in a direct-injection diesel engine
Grahic Jump Location
Source terms owing to oxidation through OH-radicals and molecular oxygen, respectively. Additionally, total soot versus engine crank angle is shown in a case of not including any source term in the temperature equation accounting for flamelet heat losses.
Grahic Jump Location
Injection rates at part load corresponding to various rail pressures. The measurements were performed using an EVI injection rate meter. Crank angles apply to an engine speed of 2000 rpm.
Grahic Jump Location
Computational grid used in the simulations
Grahic Jump Location
Pressure trace 600 bar case
Grahic Jump Location
Heat release 600 bar case
Grahic Jump Location
Pressure trace 800 bar case
Grahic Jump Location
Heat release 800 bar case
Grahic Jump Location
Pressure trace 1000 bar case
Grahic Jump Location
Heat release 1000 bar case
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of measured and predicted soot
Grahic Jump Location
Soot versus degree crank angle at different injection pressures, EEGR rate=30% and SOI=2ATDC
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of measured and predicted Nox
Grahic Jump Location
Cutplane through spray. Spatial distributions of temperature and some selected scalars will be shown in this plane.
Grahic Jump Location
Spatial distribution of temperature at the cutplane given by Fig. 15 at the crank angle of maximum heat release rate
Grahic Jump Location
Spatial distribution of Nox in the cutplane given by Fig. 15 at the crank angle of maximum heat release rate
Grahic Jump Location
Spatial distribution of soot in the cutplane given by Fig. 15 at the crank angle of maximum cylinder soot concentration
Grahic Jump Location
Spatial distribution of OH in the cutplane given by Fig. 15 at the crank angle of maximum cylinder soot concentration
Grahic Jump Location
Soot histories for individual flamelets applying a multiple wall flamelet strategy. Injection pressure: 1000 bar, EGR rate 30%, start of injection 2 deg before TDC.
Grahic Jump Location
In-cylinder soot versus engine crank angle comparing previous model with extended model accounting for wall heat losses

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In