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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Gas Turbines: Combustion and Fuel

Two-Dimensional Flow and NOx Emissions in Deflagrative Internal Combustion Wave Rotor Configurations

[+] Author and Article Information
K. Pekkan, M. R. Nalim

Mechanical Engineering Department, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis, 723 West Michigan Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 125(3), 720-733 (Aug 15, 2003) (14 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1586315 History: Received December 01, 2001; Revised March 01, 2002; Online August 15, 2003
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Internal combustion wave rotor (ICWR) with pilot partition walls
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Internal combustor wave rotor with longitudinal stratification: Developed (“unrolled”) view and basic wave dynamics. Refer to Table 1 for phase number descriptions.
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Model dimensions (in cm)
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Computational grid in the partitioned region (closeup)
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Equilibrium and relaxation time comparisons of NO models
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Temperature (K) (left) and CO2 concentration (kg/kg) (right) during the hot gas injection phase. Time=5e-6, 4e-5, and 6.5e-5 s.
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Flow and Mach number in the fuel partition during the hot gas injection phase. Time=5e-6, 4e-5, and 6.5e-5 s.
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Mach number distribution of partition exit flow. Hot gas injection. Time=0.165 ms. (Refer to Fig. 7 for color map.)
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Nondimensional turbulent kinetic energy (top) and dissipation (bottom) distributions of partition exit flow. Hot gas injection. Time=0.165 ms.
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Initial fuel distribution. Configurations are labeled (a), (b) and (c), from top to bottom.
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Pilot fuel partition tip recirculation region. Velocity vectors and C3H8 (kg/kg) contours. (Ignition cells.) (Time=15.5 ms.)
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Fuel (C3H8) Concentration in the channel after a long time (10.1 ms). Refer to Fig. 11 for field plot color map.
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Total fuel history in the channel for different initial turbulence levels. Dotted curve is specified in the computations.
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Test cases studied. Initial fuel distribution. (See color key for equivalence ratios. Cases on left have partition walls).
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Total NO mass versus time for different initial combusted gas temperatures and NO levels
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Total NOx (ppm) versus time for cases (1a, 1b, 1c, 1e, 1d). (NOx mass flow through the exhaust port are plotted on lower right corner.)  
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Unburned fuel mass in the channel
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Total NOx (ppm) versus time for cases (1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3)
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Unburned fuel exhaust flow rate histories
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Instantaneous exhaust NOx concentrations (ppm wet)

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