0
TECHNICAL PAPERS

Thermal Characteristics of Gaseous Fuel Flames Using High Temperature Air

[+] Author and Article Information
A. K. Gupta

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742e-mail: akgupta@eng.umd.edu

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 126(1), 9-19 (Mar 02, 2004) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1610009 History: Received January 01, 2000; Revised April 01, 2003; Online March 02, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Weinberg,  F. J., 1971, Nature (London), 233, Sep. 24, pp. 239–241.
Hasegawa, T., Tanaka, R., and Kishimoto, K., 1995, “High Temperature Excess-Enthalpy Combustion for Efficiency Improvement and NOx Abatement,” Paper No. 9E, paper presented at the 1995 AFRC Japan-USA Meeting, Hawaii, Oct.
Gupta, A. K., and Li, Z., 1997, “Effects of Fuel Property on the Structure of Highly Preheated Air Flames,” Proc. Intl. Joint Power Generation Conference (IJPGC), Nov. 2–5, Denver, CO.
Hasegawa, T., 1997, Proc. Intl. Joint Power Generation Conference, 1 , ASME, New York, ASME EC-Vol. 5, pp. 259–266.
Gupta,  A. K., Boltz,  S., and Hasegawa,  T., 1999, “Effect of Air Preheat and Oxygen Concentration on Flame Structure and Emissions,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 121, pp. 209–216.
Tanigawa, T., et al., 1998, “Experimental and Theoretical Analysis Results for High Temperature Air Combustion,” Proc. Intl. Joint Power Generation Conference, 1 , ASME, New York, ASME FACT-Vol. 22, pp. 207–214.
Taniguchi, H., et al., 1998, “Heat Transfer Analysis for High Temperature Preheated Air Combustion in Furnace,” Proc. Intl. Joint Power Generation Conference, 1 , ASME, New York, ASME FACT-Vol. 22, pp. 215–225.
Gupta, A. K., and Li, Z., 1997, “Effect of Fuel Property on the Structure of Highly Preheated Air Flames,” , 1998, Proc. Intl. Joint Power Generation Conference, 1 , ASME, New York, ASME EC-Vol. 5, pp. 247–258.
Kitagawa, K., et al., 1998, “Two-Dimensional Distribution of Flame Fluctuation During Highly Preheated Air Combustion,” Proc. Intl. Joint Power Generation Conference, 1 , ASME, New York, ASME FACT-Vol. 22, pp. 239–242.
Gupta, A. K., 2000, “Flame Characteristics and Challenges With High Temperature Air Combustion,” Proc. 2nd International Seminar on High Temperature Air Combustion, Jan. 17–18, Stockholm, Sweden.
Yoshikawa, K., 2000, “High Temperature Gassification of Coal, Biomass, and Solid Wastes,” Proc. 2nd Intl. Seminar on High Temperature Air Combustion, Jan. 17–18, Stockholm, Sweden.
Shimo, N., 2000, “Fundamental Research of Oil Combustion With Highly Preheated Air,” Proc. 2nd Intl. Seminar on High Temperature Air Combustion, Jan. 17–18, Stockholm, Sweden.
Weber, R., Verlann, A. L., Orsino, S., and Lallemant, N., 1999, “On Emerging Furnace Design That Provides Substantial Energy Savings and Drastic Reductions in CO2, CO and NOx Emissions,” J. of the Institute of Energy, UK, Sept. pp. 77–83.
Ahadi-Osuki, T., 2000, “Heat Flux From Highly Preheated Air Combustion and Swirl Combustion,” MS thesis, University of Maryland Combustion Laboratory, Feb.
Hasegawa, T., 2000 “Environmentally Compatible Regenerative Combustion Heating System,” Proc. 2nd International Seminar on High Temperature Air Combustion, Jan. 17–18, Stockholm, Sweden.
Gupta, A. K., Lilley, D. G., and Syred, N., 1984, Swirl Flows, Abacus Press, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England.
Hasegawa, T., and Mochida, S.; 1999, “Highly Preheated Air Combustion Characteristics and Development of a Combustion Diagnostic on Advanced Industrial Furnace Making,” Proc. Intl. Joint Power Generation Conference, San Francisco, CA, July 25–28, 1999, 1 , ASME, New York, ASME FACT-Vol. 23, pp. 457–466.
Chang, Rey-Chein, and Chang, Wen-Chiang; 2000, “Research of High Temperature Air Combustion Fired Heavy Oil,” Proc. 2nd International Seminar on High Temperature Air Combustion, Jan. 17–18, Stockholm, Sweden.
Suzukawa, Y., Sugiyama, S., and Mori, I., 1996, “Heat Transfer Improvement and NOx Reduction in an Industrial Furnace by Regenerative Combustion System,” Proc. 1996 IECEC Conference, Paper No. 96360, pp. 804–809.
Hasegawa, T., and Tanaka, R.; 1997, “Combustion with High Temperature Low Oxygen Air in Regenerative Burners,” paper presented at the 1997 ASPACC, Osaka, Japan.
Katsuki, M., and Hasegawa, T., 1999, “The Science and Technology of Combustion in Highly Preheated Air,” Proc. 27th Symposium (Intl.) on Combustion, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, pp. 3135–3146.
Gupta, A. K., and Hasegawa, T.; 1999, “Air Preheat and Oxygen Concentration Effects on the Thermal Behavior of Propane and Methane Diffusion Flames,” Proc. High Temperature Air Combustion Symposium, Jan. 20–22, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
Ishiguro, T., Tsuge, S., Furuhata, T., Kitagawa, K., Arai, N., Hasegawa, T., Tanaka, R., and Gupta, A. K., 1999, “Homogenization and Stabilization During Combustion of Hydrocarbons With Preheated Air,” Proc. 27th Symposium (Intl.) on Combustion, The Combustion Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, pp. 3205–3213.
Kitagawa, K., Konishi, N., Arai, N., and Gupta, A. K., 1998, “Two-Dimensional Distribution of Flame Fluctuation During Highly Preheated Air Combustion,” Proc. ASME Intl. Joint Power Generation Conference (IJPGC), ASME, New York, ASME FACT-Vol. 22, pp. 239–242.
Gupta, A. K., 2001, “High Temperature Air Combustion: Experiences From the USA-Japan Joint Energy Project,” invited keynote lecture at the 4th High Temperature Air Combustion and Gasification Symposium, Nov. 27–30, Rome Italy.
Gupta, A. K., 2002, “Flame Length and Ignition Delay During the Combustion of Acetylene in High Temperature Air,” invited paper, Proc. 5th High Temperature Air Combustion and Gasification (5th HTACG), Oct. 28–31, Yokohama, Japan.
Konishi,  N., Kitagawa,  K., Arai,  N., and Gupta,  A. K., 2002, “Two-Dimensional Spectroscopic Analysis of Spontaneous Emission From a Flame Using Highly Preheated Air Combustion,” J. Propul. Power, 18, pp. 199–204.
Hasegawa,  T., Mochida,  S., and Gupta,  A. K., 2002, “Development of Advanced Industrial Furnace Using Highly Preheated Combustion Air,” J. Propul. Power, 18, pp. 233–239.
Kitagawa,  K., Konishi,  N., Arai,  N., and Gupta,  A. K., 2003, “Temporally Resolved 2-D Spectroscopic Study on the Effect of Highly Preheated and Low Oxygen Concentration Air on Combustion,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 125, pp. 326–331.
Tsuji, H., Gupta, A. K., Hasegawa, T., Katsuki, M., Kishimoto, K., Morita, M., 2003, High Temperature Air Combustion: From Energy Conservation to Pollution Reduction, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 401 pp.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
A schematic diagram of flame and heat flux distribution in a furnace with low temperature combustion air, high temperature air, and HiTAC combustion conditions
Grahic Jump Location
A schematic diagram of the experimental test facility
Grahic Jump Location
Stability limits of propane flames at high temperature and different oxygen concentration in air
Grahic Jump Location
Flame photographs with combustion air temperature of 1100°C and O2 concentration (from left to right) of 21%, 8% and 2% (nitrogen as dilution gas)
Grahic Jump Location
Increase in green flame volume with decrease in O2 concentration and increase in air-preheat temperature
Grahic Jump Location
Flame emission spectra at one point in the flame (x=3 cm and Y=1.5 cm) and three air-preheat temperatures (nitrogen as the dilution gas)
Grahic Jump Location
Emission of NOx as a function of air-preheat temperature and O2 concentration in air using propane as the fuel (nitrogen as the dilution gas)
Grahic Jump Location
Emission of NOx as a function of air-preheat temperature and O2 concentration in air using carbon monoxide as the fuel (nitrogen as the dilution gas)
Grahic Jump Location
Heat flux variation along the flame using propane as the fuel, Tair=1000°C (sensor at 6.5 in. from the center axis of flame), arbitrary unit of heat flux
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Methane flame photographs with combustion air temperature of 1000°C and oxygen concentrations (from left to right) of 21%, 8%, and 2%, respectively (nitrogen as dilution gas). (b) Methane flame photographs with combustion air temperature of 1000°C and oxygen concentrations (from left to right) of 21%, 8%, and 2%, respectively (carbon dioxide as dilution gas).
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Acetylene flame photographs with combustion air temperature of 1000°C and oxygen concentrations (from left to right) of 21%, 8%, and 2%, respectively (nitrogen as dilution gas). (b) Acetylene flame photographs with combustion air temperature of 1000°C and oxygen concentrations (from left to right) of 21%, 8%, and 2%, respectively (carbon dioxide as dilution gas).

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In