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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Fuels and Combustion Technology

Reducing Grid Dependency in Droplet Collision Modeling

[+] Author and Article Information
David P. Schmidt

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Box 32210 Amherst, MA 01003-2210

Christopher J. Rutland

University of Wisconsin Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 126(2), 227-233 (Jun 07, 2004) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1564066 History: Received November 01, 2001; Revised August 01, 2002; Online June 07, 2004
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
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References

Figures

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The prediction of the NTC collision algorithm when the gas velocity is constrained to zero. The results are perfectly grid independent.
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Simulation of a hollow-cone spray using the standard KIVA3V Release 2 code with the NTC collision algorithm turned on and breakup and turbulence turned off. Simulation is done with the injector on a vertex of a Cartesian mesh. Injection is directed towards the viewer, and the drops are shaded by diameter.
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A plot of the chance of collision for all possible collision pairs in a given cell
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A subsample of possible collision partners drawn from the example in Fig. 5. The probabilities have been multiplied by the number of possible pairs divided by the subsample size.
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A collision mesh enveloping a diesel spray. The gas phase mesh is in the background.
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A test case used to determine the accuracy of the NTC method. Parcels are distributed according to prescribed probabilities so that an analytical solution for the incidence of collision is possible. Note the strong spatial variation in the parcel density.
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Simulation of a hollow-cone spray using the standard KIVA3V Release 2 code with collision (O’Rourke’s) turned on and breakup and turbulence turned off. The simulation is done with the injector on a vertex of a Cartesian mesh. The injection is directed towards the viewer, and the drops are shaded by diameter.
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Simulation of a hollow-cone spray using the standard KIVA3V Release 2 code with collision, breakup and turbulence turned off. The simulation is done with the injector on a vertex of a Cartesian mesh. The injection is directed towards the viewer, and the drops are shaded by diameter.
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A sketch of the parcel trajectories around an injection located at a vertex. The trajectories that are nearly 90 deg apart are the most likely collision partners.
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A sketch of the parcel trajectories around an injection located at a cell center. The trajectories that are 180 deg apart are the most likely collision partners.
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The spatial accuracy of the NTC method is second order. With 25 cells in the collision mesh in the y-direction, the error is less than 1%.
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Collision mesh resolution in the axial and radial directions as a function of time
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Calculated average drop size for a diesel-type spray using KIVA3V Release 2 with three different Cartesian meshes. This figure shows the grid dependency of O’Rourke’s collision model. The evaporation, breakup, and turbulence models were turned off, and collision was turned on.
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The same test as shown in Fig. 7, but with the NTC collision algorithm. Note the reduced mesh dependency.
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The prediction of the NTC collision algorithm when the gas velocity is constrained to zero. The results show the effect of simultaneously changing the number of parcels used and the collision mesh resolution.

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