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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Fuels and Combustion Technology

Time-Resolved Temperature Profiling of Flames With Highly Preheated/Low Oxygen Concentration Air in an Industrial Size Furnace

[+] Author and Article Information
T. Shimada

Keihin Works, NKK Corporation, 1-1 Minamiwatarida-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki 210-0855, Japan

T. Akiyama, S. Fukushima

 NKK Corporation, 1-1-2 Marunochi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8202, Japan

K. Mitsui

 Photron Limited, 1-9-8 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002, Japan

M. Jinno

Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan

K. Kitagawa, N. Arai

Research Center for Advanced Energy Conversion, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan

Ashwani K. Gupta

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742akgupta@eng.umd.edu

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 127(3), 464-471 (Jun 01, 2004) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1914801 History: Received December 03, 2002; Revised June 01, 2004

A high-speed video camera was combined with a newly developed optical system to measure time resolved two-dimensional (2D) temperature distribution in flames. This diagnostics has been applied to measure the temperature distribution in an industrial size regenerative test furnace facility using highly preheated combustion air and heavy fuel oil. The 2D distributions of continuum emission from soot particles in these flames have been simultaneously measured at two discrete wave bands at 125 frames/sec. This allowed us to determine the temperature from each image on the basis of two-color 2D thermometry, in which the ratio of the 2D emission intensity distribution at various spatial position in the flame was converted into the respective 2D temperature distribution with much higher spatial resolution as compared to that obtainable with thermocouples. This diagnostic method was applied to both premixed and diffusion flames with highly preheated low oxygen concentration combustion air using heavy fuel oil. The results show that higher temperature regions exist continuously in the premixed flame as compared to the diffusion flame. This provided clear indication of higher NO emission from the premixed flame as compared to diffusion flames during the combustion of heavy fuel oil under high-temperature air combustion conditions. This observation is contrary to that obtained with normal temperature combustion air wherein diffusion flames result in higher NOx emission levels.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

A schematic diagram of the industrial size test furnace

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Figure 2

A schematic diagram of the two wavelength high-speed video camera

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Figure 3

Details of the optical system for separating the two wavelength images

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Figure 4

Two wavelength images of background emission from furnace wall through window B

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Figure 5

Two wavelength images and temperature profile

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Figure 6

Time-resolved temperature profiles of premixed flame through window A

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Figure 7

Time-resolved temperature profiles of diffusion flame through window A

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Figure 8

Time-resolved temperature profiles of premixed flame through window B

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Figure 9

Time-resolved temperature profiles of diffusion flame through window B

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Figure 10

Profiles of average temperature and standard deviation of temperature for premixed flame

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Figure 11

Profiles of average temperature and standard deviation of temperature for diffusion flame

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