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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Fuels and Combustion Technology

Spectroscopic Measurements of High Emissivity Materials Using Two-Dimensional Two-Color Thermometry

[+] Author and Article Information
Yuichiro Tago

Department of Energy Engineering and Science,  Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan

Fumie Akimoto, Kuniyuki Kitagawa

Research Center for Advanced Energy Conversion, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan

Norio Arai1

Research Center for Advanced Energy Conversion, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan

Stuart W. Churchill

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, 311A Towne Building, 220 S. 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104

Ashwani K. Gupta2

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742akgupta@eng.umd.edu

1

Deceased.

2

To whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 127(3), 472-477 (Aug 10, 2004) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1917889 History: Received December 20, 2002; Revised August 10, 2004

Radiative heat transfer characteristics from the surface of a substance coated with a high-emissivity material have been examined from the measured two-dimensional (2D) temperature distribution using two-color thermometry principle. The technique utilized a charge coupled device camera and optical filters having either wide or narrow wavelength bandpass filters. The results obtained were compared to evaluate the accuracy of the temperature measurements. The 2D emissivity distributions were also derived from the measured 2D temperature distributions. The results indicate that the substrate coated with high-emissivity material exhibit high emission of radiation, resulting in effective cooling. The enhanced emissivity of materials also results in improved radiative heat transfer in heating furnaces and other high-temperature applications. The emissivity measured with the wide-bandpass filters increased with temperature. Atmospheric absorption, mainly due to humidity, made a negligible contribution to the total spectral intensity and to the temperature measurements. The small discrepancies are attributed to the dependence of emissivity on wavelength. Thus, the use of narrow-bandpass filters in thermometry is advantageous over the wide-bandpass ones.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Temperature dependency on emissivity for various materials

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Figure 2

Experimental apparatus (upper diagram) and sample plate (lower diagram)

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Figure 3

Intensity ratio of blackbody furnaces with wideband and narrowband filters

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Figure 4

(a) Intensity distribution obtained with (left) and without (right) coating using wide-bandpass filters. (b) Temperature distribution obtained with (left) and without (right) coating using wide-bandpass filters. (c) Emissivity distribution obtained with (left) and without (right) coating using the wide-bandpass filters.

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Figure 5

(a) Intensity distribution obtained with (left) and without (right) coating using narrow-bandpass filters. (b) Temperature distribution obtained with (left) and without (right) coating using narrow-bandpass filters. (c) Emissivity distribution obtained with (left) and without (right) coating using narrow-bandpass filters.

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Figure 6

Measured intensity spectra in the experimental range

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