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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Gas Turbines: Cycle Innovations

H2O2 Cycles: Thermodynamic Potentialities and Limits

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Gambini

Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico n. 1, 00133 Rome, Italygambini@ing.uniroma2.it

G. L. Guizzi, M. Vellini

Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico n. 1, 00133 Rome, Italy

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 127(3), 553-563 (Aug 10, 2004) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1924401 History: Received July 29, 2003; Revised August 10, 2004

In this paper, the thermodynamic potentialities and limits of the H2O2 turbine cycles (afterward named only H2O2 cycles) are investigated. Starting from the conventional gas turbine and steam turbine technology, the paper qualitatively tackles problems related to a change of oxidizer and fuel: from these considerations, an internal combustion steam cycle is analyzed where steam, injected into the combustion chamber together with oxygen and hydrogen, is produced in a regenerative way and plays the important role of inert. A proper parametric analysis is then performed in order to evaluate the influence of the main working parameters on the overall performance of H2O2 cycles. All the results are carried out by neglecting the energy requirements for O2 and H2 production systems, but taking into account the work required by the O2 and H2 compression. This choice permits a great freedom in the definition of these thermodynamic cycles; moreover, it is possible to come to some general conclusions because the H2 and/or O2 production systems and their integrations with thermodynamic cycles do not have to be specified. Therefore, this paper can be framed in a context of centralized production of oxygen and hydrogen (by nuclear or renewable energy sources, for example) and their distribution as pure gases in the utilization place. By adopting some realistic assumptions, for example, a top temperature of 1350°C, the potentialities of H2O2 cycles are very limited: the net efficiency attains a value of about 50%. Instead, by adopting futurist assumptions, for example, a top temperature of 1700°C, a different H2O2 cycle scheme can be proposed and its performance becomes more interesting (the net efficiency is over 60%). The paper tackles the main thermodynamic and technological subjects of the H2O2 cycles: for example, it is underlined how the choice of the working parameters of these cycles strongly influences the attainable performance.

Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Combined cycle layout with n combustions

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Figure 2

O2 fraction as function of the combustion chambers

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Figure 3

Qualitative internal combustion steam cycle on the plane T-s

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Figure 4

Hybrid scheme with pressurized separator

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Figure 5

Hybrid scheme with atmospheric separator

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Figure 7

H2∕O2 cycle scheme: reference case

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Figure 8

H2∕O2 cycle performance (TIT=1350°C)

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Figure 9

H2∕O2 cycle working parameters (TIT=1350°C)

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Figure 10

Reference case: material and energetic balances

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Figure 11

Reference case: thermodynamic cycle (referred to the unitary mass of steam)

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Figure 12

H2∕O2 cycle performance (TIT=1500°C)

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Figure 13

H2∕O2 cycle performance (TIT=1700°C)

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Figure 14

H2∕O2 cycle scheme: new reference case

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Figure 15

New H2∕O2 cycle performance (TIT=1350°C)

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Figure 16

New H2∕O2 cycle performance (TIT=1500°C)

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Figure 17

New H2∕O2 cycle performance (TIT=1700°C)

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Figure 18

New reference case: material and energetic balances

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Figure 19

New reference case: thermodynamic cycle (referred to the unitary mass of steam)

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