0
TECHNICAL PAPERS: Gas Turbines: Combustion and Fuels

A Novel Approach to Mechanism Reduction Optimization for an Aviation Fuel/Air Reaction Mechanism Using a Genetic Algorithm

[+] Author and Article Information
L. Elliott, D. B. Ingham

Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK

A. G. Kyne1

Energy and Resources Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UKfueagk@sun.leeds.ac.uk

N. S. Mera, M. Pourkashanian

Energy and Resources Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK

C. W. Wilson

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, UK

1

To whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 128(2), 255-263 (Mar 01, 2004) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2131887 History: Received October 01, 2003; Revised March 01, 2004

This study presents a novel multiobjective genetic-algorithm approach to produce a new reduced chemical kinetic reaction mechanism to simulate aviation fuel combustion under various operating conditions. The mechanism is used to predict the flame structure of an aviation fuel/O2N2 flame in both spatially homogeneous and one-dimensional premixed combustion. Complex hydrocarbon fuels, such as aviation fuel, involve large numbers of reaction steps with many species. As all the reaction rate data are not well known, there is a high degree of uncertainty in the results obtained using these large detailed reaction mechanisms. In this study a genetic algorithm approach is employed for determining new reaction rate parameters for a reduced reaction mechanism for the combustion of aviation fuel-air mixtures. The genetic algorithm employed incorporates both perfectly stirred reactor and laminar premixed flame data in the inversion process, thus producing an efficient reaction mechanism. This study provides an optimized reduced aviation fuel-air reaction scheme whose performance in predicting experimental major species profiles and ignition delay times is not only an improvement on the starting reduced mechanism but also on the full mechanism.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Burning velocities as functions of the distance from the surface of the burner obtained by the three reaction mechanisms considered for a rich premixed aviation fuel/O2∕N2 flame (Φ=1.7) at various pressures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

The ignition delay time at various temperatures T=1000–2500K and the air/fuel ratio Φ=1.0 as predicted by the three reaction mechanisms: GA-MECH, ORIGINAL, and AFRMv1.1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

The combined fitness function f given by Eq. 4 that measures the improvement in predicting PREMIX and PSR output species. The line depicts the evolution of the GA-MECH fitness. The ORIGINAL mechanism of Kyne (7) was used as a starting point for the search.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Concentration profiles of various species as functions of the distance from the surface of the burner for a rich atmospheric premixed aviation fuel flame obtained by the GA-MECH (—엯—), the ORIGINAL (⋯) mechanism of Kyne (7), the AFRMv1.1 reaction mechanism (—), and the measured experimental data of Douté (4) (∎)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Concentration profiles of (a) Aviation fuel; (b) O2; (c) CO; (d) CO2; (e) H2; (f) CH4; and (g) C6H6 obtained for various output species for aviation fuel oxidation in a jet stirred reactor at p=10atm, residence t=0.5s and equivalence ratio=1.5 as functions of the inlet temperatures; and (h) profile C6H6 at p=40atm, residence t=2.0s; and equivalence ratio=1.0. Comparisons are made between GA-MECH (—엯—), the ORIGINAL (⋯) mechanism of Kyne (7), the AFRMv1.1 reaction mechanism (—), and the measured experimental data of Dagaut (2) (∎).

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In