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TECHNICAL BRIEFS

Tuning Your Fuel-Gas Delivery System

[+] Author and Article Information
T. D. Newbound

Saudi Aramco,  R&D Center, Box 62, Dhahran 31311, Saudi Arabiatimothy.newbound@aramco.com

K. S. Al-Showiman

Saudi Aramco,  R&D Center, Box 62, Dhahran 31311, Saudi Arabia

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 128(2), 463-467 (Sep 27, 2004) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2031267 History: Received June 06, 2004; Revised September 27, 2004

Saudi Aramco has focused more attention in recent years on fuel-gas conditioning for land-based industrial and aeroderivative combustion gas turbines (CGTs). Hydrocarbon dew points and entrained solids are two important fuel quality issues that frequently trouble CGT operators, partly because they cannot be guaranteed by the fuel suppliers and they are rarely monitored by the operators. This paper addresses these issues and offers some practical advice to optimize the design and operation of fuel gas delivery systems. Saudi Aramco has been testing an automated on-line dew point monitor capable of detecting both hydrocarbon and aqueous dew points in natural gas. Dew point monitoring, conducted at three locations on the fuel gas grid, revealed wide variations in the hydrocarbon and aqueous dew points due to a variety of conditions. Gas production and pipeline operations accounted for the most dramatic variations in dew points, but exposure of pipelines to the weather can also be important. Measurement of pipeline solids for the purpose of sizing and placement of particle filters have also been explored. Pipeline scraping, gas velocities, length of pipeline span, pipeline junctions, and control valves are all considerations for solid control strategies. The optimized design and operation of a CGT fuel system is highly dependent on dew point control and efficient removal of entrained pipeline solids. Practical experience in monitoring hydrocarbon and aqueous dew points, pipeline solids control, and optimizing fuel conditioning equipment are considered.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Hydrocarbon dew points recorded over a three month period reveal dramatic changes that coincide with major operational events in the gas plants

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Figure 2

(Color) Hydrocarbon dew points plotted with archived fuel inlet temperature and pressure for one CGTG unit at a power plant feed by the local fuel-gas system near the central Ghawar region gas plant UGP. Note that saturated fuel gas conditions coincide with elevated fuel pressure.

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Figure 3

Average daily production rates from South Ghawar Gas Plants

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Figure 4

On-line hydrocarbon and water dew points recorded with the Ametek 241 CE dew point monitor at Pump Station 3 (SRG 1 sales gas)

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Figure 5

On-line hydrocarbon and water dew points recorded with the Ametek 241 CE dew point monitor at E∕W Pipeline Pump Station 3 from March 10–June 10, 2003

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Figure 6

On-line hydrocarbon and water dew points recorded with the Ametek 241 CE dew point monitor at E∕W Pipeline Pump Station 3 from July 7–August 12, 2003

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