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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Gas Turbines: Electric Power

A Sequential Approach for Gas Turbine Power Plant Preventative Maintenance Scheduling

[+] Author and Article Information
Yongjun Zhao, Vitali Volovoi, Mark Waters, Dimitri Mavris

School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 270 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0150

An operations and maintenance cycle is the time period that includes a major maintenance (including combustion inspection, hot gas path inspection, or major inspection), and the subsequent continuous operating period.

Here spark spread is defined as the difference between the spot market value of natural gas and the electricity at a given time based on the conversion efficiency of a given gas-fired plant.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 128(4), 796-805 (Dec 14, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2179470 History: Received February 18, 2005; Revised December 14, 2005

Traditionally, gas turbine power plant preventive maintenance schedules are set with constant intervals based on recommendations from the equipment suppliers. Preventive maintenance is based on fleet-wide experience as a guideline as long as individual unit experience is not available. In reality, the operating conditions for each gas turbine may vary from site to site and from unit to unit. Furthermore, the gas turbine is a repairable deteriorating system, and preventive maintenance usually restores only part of its performance. This suggests a gas turbine needs more frequent inspection and maintenance as it ages. A unit-specific sequential preventive maintenance approach is therefore needed for gas turbine power plant preventive maintenance scheduling. Traditionally, the optimization criteria for preventive maintenance scheduling is usually cost based. However, in the deregulated electric power market, a profit-based optimization approach is expected to be more effective than the cost-based approach. In such an approach, power plant performance, reliability, and the market dynamics are considered in a joint fashion. In this paper, a novel idea that economic factors drive maintenance frequency and expense to more frequent repairs and greater expense as equipment ages is introduced, and a profit-based unit-specific sequential preventive maintenance scheduling methodology is developed. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach, a conceptual level study is performed using a base load combined cycle power plant with a single gas turbine unit.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Expected cost of maintenance and its components as a function of the length of the preventive maintenance interval for the first O&M cycle

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Figure 2

Cost of maintenance and cost rate of maintenance as a function of the length of preventive maintenance interval for the first O&M cycle

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Figure 3

Expected profit and profit rate as a function of the length of preventive maintenance interval for the first O&M cycle

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Figure 4

Gas turbine system actual age and virtual age as a function of calendar time for the sequential preventive maintenance schedule

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Figure 5

Gas turbine system failure rate as a function of calendar time for the sequential preventive maintenance schedule

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Figure 6

Power plant performance degradation as a function of calendar time for the sequential preventive maintenance schedule

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Figure 7

Power plant expected cost of maintenance and its components as a function of calendar time for the sequential preventive maintenance schedule

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Figure 8

Power plant cumulative cash flow as a function of calendar time for the sequential preventive maintenance schedule

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Figure 9

Price of electricity, profit rate, and cost rate of maintenance as a function of the length of the preventive maintenance interval. (With consideration of the seasonal trend of the price of electricity.)

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