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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Gas Turbines: Industrial and Cogeneration

Gas Turbine Fogging Technology: A State-of-the-Art Review—Part II: Overspray Fogging—Analytical and Experimental Aspects

[+] Author and Article Information
R. K. Bhargava

22515 Holly Lake Drive, Katy, TX 77450

C. B. Meher-Homji, M. A. Chaker

 Bechtel Corporation, 3000 Post Oak Boulevard, Houston, TX 77056

M. Bianchi, F. Melino, A. Peretto

 University of Bologna, DIEM, Facolta di Ingegneria, Viale Risorgimento 2, Bologna 40136, Italy

S. Ingistov

 Watson Cogeneration Co./BP, 11850 S. Wilmington Avenue, P. O. Box 6203, Carson, CA 90749

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 129(2), 454-460 (Feb 01, 2006) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2364004 History: Received October 01, 2005; Revised February 01, 2006

The strong influence of ambient temperature on the output and heat rate on a gas turbine has popularized the application of inlet fogging and overspray for power augmentation. One of the main advantages of overspray fogging is that it enhances power output as a result of decrease in compression work associated with the continuous evaporation of water within the compressor due to fog intercooling. A comprehensive review on the current understanding of the analytical and experimental aspects of overspray fogging technology as applied to gas turbines is presented in this paper.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Compressor work input ratio (W_C) versus turbine inlet temperature (TIT) for existing gas turbines (ambient conditions: 40°C and 40% RH)

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Figure 2

(a) Effect of evaporation rate on compressor exit temperature for wet compression process at a pressure ratio of 30 (see Ref. 7) and (b) effect of evaporation rate on compression work for wet compression process at a pressure ratio of 30 (see Ref. 7)

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Figure 3

Effects of spray flow rate and polytropic efficiency (denoted by “n” in the legend) on specific work ratio for pressure ratio of 30 (see Ref. 10)

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Figure 4

(a) Effect of droplet size on specific work ratio (compression rate 870 bars/s and polytropic efficiency 100%); (b) effect of droplet size on specific work ratio (compression rate 870 bars/s and polytropic efficiency 80%) (see Ref. 10)

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Figure 5

Stage flow coefficient relative to their design value—effect of wet compression with 5μm droplets (see Ref. 11)

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Figure 6

(a) First stage performance maps and operating points with water injection (reference: ISO case); (b) seventeenth stage performance maps and operating points with water injection (reference: ISO case); (c) first stage performance maps and operating points with water injection (reference: HOT case); (d) seventeenth stage performance maps and operating points with water injection (reference: HOT case) (see Ref. 21)

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Figure 7

Power boost due to water sprayed in the airflow DBT=37.8°C(100°F), WBT=26.1°C(79°F)

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Figure 8

Experimental power boost due to water sprayed with the airflow in an advanced industrial gas turbine inlet air duct

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