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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Fuels and Combustion Technologies (FACT)

Experimental Investigation of Flow Phenomena of a Single Fuel Jet in Cross-Flow During Highly Preheated Air Combustion Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Magnus Mörtberg, Wlodzimierz Blasiak

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Combustion Laboratory, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Division of Energy and Furnace Technology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), S10044, Stockholm, Sweden

Ashwani K. Gupta1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Combustion Laboratory, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742akgupta@eng.umd.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 129(2), 556-564 (May 28, 2006) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2436558 History: Received October 22, 2004; Revised May 28, 2006

Particle image velocimetry and a spectroscopy technique has been used to obtain information on the flow dynamics and flame thermal signatures of a fuel jet injected into a cross-flow of normal temperature and very high-temperature combustion air. Flame fluctuations were obtained using a high-speed camera and then performing fast Fourier transform on the signal. High-temperature air combustion has been demonstrated to provide significant energy savings, higher heat flux, and reduction of pollution and equipment size of industrial furnaces. The dynamics of flow associated with high temperature combustion air conditions (for mean velocity, axial strain rate and vorticity) has been obtained in two-dimensional using propane and methane as the fuels. The data have been compared with normal temperature combustion air case, including the nonburning case. A specially designed experimental test furnace facility was used to provide well-controlled conditions and allowed air preheats to 1100°C using regenerative burners. Four different experimental cases have been examined. The momentum flux ratio between the burning and nonburning conditions was kept constant to provide comparison between cases. The results provide the role of high-temperature combustion air on the dynamics of the flow, turbulence, and mixing under nonburning and combustion conditions. The data provide the direct role of combustion on flow dynamics, turbulence, and flame fluctuations. High-temperature combustion air at low-oxygen concentration showed larger flame volume with less fluctuation than normal or high-temperature normal air cases. High-temperature combustion air technology prolongs mixing in the combustion zone to enhance the flame volume, reduce flame fluctuations, and to provide uniform flow and thermal characteristics. This information assists in model validation and model development for new applications and technology development using high-temperature air combustion principles.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Average velocity normalized by jet exit velocity at: (a) 298K, 21%O2 combustion air, nonburning, fuel jet=70.0L∕hCH4 (left diagram); and (b) 298K, 21%O2 combustion air, burning, fuel jet=70.0L∕hCH4 (right diagram)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Vorticity distribution normalized by jet exit velocity at: (a) 1173K, 5%O2 combustion air, burning, fuel jet=25.0L∕hC3H8 (left diagram); and (b) 1173K, 5%O2 combustion air, burning, fuel jet=42.0L∕hCH4 (right diagram)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Flame fluctuations with: (a) normal temperature air, (b) high-temperature air; and (c) high-temperature and low-oxygen concentration air (14)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Average velocity normalized by jet exit velocity at: (a) 1173K, 5%O2 combustion air, burning, fuel jet=25.0L∕hC3H8 (left diagram); and (b) 1173K, 5%O2 combustion air, burning, fuel jet=42.0L∕hCH4 (right diagram)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Average velocity, normalized by jet exit velocity at (a): 298K, 21%O2 combustion air, nonburning, fuel jet=42.0L∕hC3H8 (left diagram); and (b) 298K, 21%O2 combustion air, burning fuel jet=42.0L∕hC3H8 (right diagram)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

A schematic diagram of the experimental high-temperature air combustion test facility

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Average velocity normalized by jet exit velocity at: (a) 1173K, 5%O2 combustion air, burning, fuel jet=25.0L∕hC3H8 (left diagram); and (b) 1173K, 5%O2 combustion air, burning, fuel jet=42.0L∕hCH4 (right diagram)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Axial strain rate distribution normalized by jet exit velocity at: (a) 298K, 21%O2 combustion air, nonburning, fuel jet=42.0L∕hC3H8 (left diagram); and (b) 298K, 21%O2 combustion air, burning fuel jet=42.0L∕hC3H8 (right diagram)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Vorticity distribution normalized by jet exit velocity at: (a) 298K, 21%O2 combustion air, nonburning, fuel jet=42.0L∕hC3H8 (left diagram); and (b) 298K, 21%O2 combustion air, burning fuel jet=42.0L∕hC3H8 (right diagram)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Axial strain rate distribution normalized by jet exit velocity at: (a) 298K, 21%O2 combustion air, nonburning, fuel jet=70.0L∕hCH4 (left diagram); and (b) 298K, 21%O2 combustion air, burning, fuel jet=70.0L∕hCH4 (right diagram)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Vorticity distribution normalized by jet exit velocity at: (a) 298K, 21%O2 combustion air, nonburning, fuel jet=70.0L∕hCH4 (left diagram); and (b) 298K, 21%O2 combustion air, burning, fuel jet=70.0L∕CH4 (right diagram)

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