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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Internal Combustion Engines

Numerical and Experimental Analysis of the Intake Flow in a High Performance Four-Stroke Motorcycle Engine: Influence of the Two-Equation Turbulence Models

[+] Author and Article Information
Angelo Algieri

Mechanics Department, University of Calabria, 87030 Arcavacata di Rende (CS), Italya.algieri@unical.it

Sergio Bova

Mechanics Department, University of Calabria, 87030 Arcavacata di Rende (CS), Italys.bova@unical.it

Carmine De Bartolo

Mechanics Department, University of Calabria, 87030 Arcavacata di Rende (CS), Italyc.debartolo@unical.it

Alessandra Nigro

Mechanics Department, University of Calabria, 87030 Arcavacata di Rende (CS), Italyanigro@unical.it

The port Reynolds number is defined as the Reynolds number calculated at the intake port. More details are given in (16,36).

B is the cylinder bore.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 129(4), 1095-1105 (Jan 24, 2007) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2719265 History: Received August 21, 2006; Revised January 24, 2007

An experimental and numerical analysis of the intake system of a production high performance four-stroke motorcycle engine was carried out. The aim of the work was to characterize the fluid dynamic behavior of the engine during the intake phase and to evaluate the capability of the most commonly used two-equation turbulence models to reproduce the in-cylinder flow field for a very complex engine head. Pressure and mass flow rates were measured on a steady-flow rig. Furthermore, velocity measurements were obtained within the combustion chamber using laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). The experimental data were compared to the numerical results using four two-equation turbulence models (standard k-ε, realizable k-ε, Wilcox k-ω, and SST k-ω models). All the investigated turbulence models well predicted the global performances of the intake system and the mean flow structure inside the cylinder. Some differences between measurements and computations were found close to the cylinder head while an improving agreement was evident moving away from the engine head. Furthermore, the Wilcox k-ω model permitted the flow field inside the combustion chamber of the engine to be reproduced and the overall angular momentum of the flux with respect to the cylinder axis to be quantified more properly.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Motorcycle engine

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Figure 2

Experimental setup

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Figure 3

LDA analysis: measurement locations

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Figure 4

Effect of the valve lift on head breathability. WOT configuration.

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Figure 5

Velocity measurements on the three measuring planes

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Figure 6

Three-dimensional in-cylinder flow

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Figure 7

Numerical in-cylinder flow field: vertical plane with D2 diameter

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Figure 8

Numerical in-cylinder flow field: vertical plane with D1 diameter

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Figure 9

Numerical in-cylinder flow field: horizontal plane H∕B=1∕4

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Figure 10

Numerical in-cylinder flow field: horizontal plane H∕B=1∕2

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Figure 11

Numerical in-cylinder flow field: horizontal plane H∕B=3∕4

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Figure 12

Numerical and experimental static pressure at the outlet section

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Figure 13

Percentage error in the static pressure at the outlet section

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Figure 14

k-ε numerical results and LDA data comparison

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Figure 15

k-ω numerical results and LDA data comparison

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Figure 16

Numerical and experimental torque at the outlet section

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