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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Aircraft Engine

Optimal Mission Analysis Accounting for Engine Aging and Emissions

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Kelaidis

Laboratory of Thermal Turbomachines, National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Polytechniou 9, Zografou, Athens 15780, Greecemanousos@gmail.com

N. Aretakis

Laboratory of Thermal Turbomachines, National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Polytechniou 9, Zografou, Athens 15780, Greecenaret@central.ntua.gr

A. Tsalavoutas

Laboratory of Thermal Turbomachines, National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Polytechniou 9, Zografou, Athens 15780, Greecettsal@ltt.ntua.gr

K. Mathioudakis

Laboratory of Thermal Turbomachines, National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Polytechniou 9, Zografou, Athens 15780, Greecekmathiou@central.ntua.gr

The package has been given the name CAMACM. (Commercial Aircraft Mission Analysis Computational Model)

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 131(1), 011201 (Nov 20, 2008) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2969095 History: Received April 11, 2008; Revised April 14, 2008; Published November 20, 2008

An aircraft mission analysis procedure, accounting for engine aging deterioration and incorporating emission estimation capability, is presented. It consists of three main modules: a flight simulation module, an engine performance simulation module, and an optimizer. A key feature of the approach is the incorporation of engine deterioration modeling. This extends the procedure’s ability to estimate onboard performance of an engine as it ages through time and usage. Additionally, the possibility to investigate environmental impact is offered through pollutant emission semi-empirical correlations, which are coupled to the engine performance calculations. The adaptive character of the models employed allows for accurate performance and emission estimations once an initial set of data is available for the engine. The proposed procedure allows the optimization of a flight scenario for a variety of aircrafts, missions, and engine condition combinations in order to meet predefined criteria. Mission profile characteristics (e.g., cruise, altitude, and speed) providing optimum overall performance in terms of fuel conservation, time related costs, or pollutant production are studied.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Comparison of predicted (model) and ICAO published data (fuel consumption versus thrust)

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Figure 2

SFC versus time during take-off, climb, and cruise for two different engine condition cases

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Figure 3

Engine speed versus time during take-off, climb, and cruise for two different engine condition cases

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Figure 4

TIT versus time during take-off, climb, and cruise for two different engine condition cases

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Figure 5

Flow chart for the optimization procedure

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Figure 6

Convergence history (CF versus Iterations) for a typical optimization case

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Figure 7

Optimized climb trajectories

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Figure 8

Optimized climb trajectories for different mission length cases

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Figure 9

Evolution of optimum cruise speed with TOW for two different mission length cases

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Figure 10

Evolution of optimum cruise altitude with TOW for two different mission length cases

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Figure 11

Evolution of optimum initial flight path angle with TOW for two different mission length cases

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Figure 12

Comparison of estimated NOx derived from both the initial and the adapted form of the correlation with the ICAO published data

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Figure 13

Predicted pollutant emission production rate during a typical short mission (1.5 h)

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