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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Prediction of Aeroacoustic Resonance in Cavities of Hole-Pattern Stator Seals

[+] Author and Article Information
David N. Liliedahl

Department of Aerospace Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-3141liliedahl@tamu.edu

Forrest L. Carpenter

Department of Aerospace Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-3141forrest@tamu.edu

Paul G. A. Cizmas1

Department of Aerospace Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-3141cizmas@tamu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 133(2), 022504 (Oct 29, 2010) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002038 History: Received April 26, 2010; Revised April 29, 2010; Published October 29, 2010; Online October 29, 2010

A Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) solver developed in-house was used to simulate grazing channel flow past single and multiple cavities. The objective of this investigation was to predict fluid instabilities in hole-pattern stator seals. The numerical results generated with the RANS solver showed good agreement with those obtained using a commercial large eddy simulation code. In addition, the numerical results agreed well with experimental data. Rossiter’s formula, a popular semi-empirical model used to predict frequencies of hole-tone acoustic instabilities caused by grazing fluid flow past open cavities, was modified using the RANS solver results to allow for its application to channel flows. This was done by modifying the empirical constant κ, the ratio of vortex velocity, and the freestream velocity. The dominant frequencies predicted using Rossiter’s formula with the new κ value matched well with the experimental data for hole-pattern stator seals. The RANS solver accurately captured the salient features of the flow/acoustic interaction and predicted well the dominant acoustic frequencies measured in an experimental investigation. The flow solver also provided detailed physical insight into the cavity flow instability mechanism.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Features of cavity flow

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Figure 2

Computational domain with pressure probe locations

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Figure 3

Grid convergence: dominant frequency versus total number of nodes

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Figure 4

Grid 2, details of the cavity region

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Figure 5

Snapshot of pressure contours showing vortex A and dipole B: (a) LES simulation and (b) RANS simulation

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Figure 6

Velocity profiles generated with the LES and RANS solvers; profiles located at five evenly spaced axial locations through the cavity

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Figure 7

Pressure time history generated with the LES and RANS solvers

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Figure 8

Pressure variation versus frequency generated with the LES and RANS solvers

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Figure 9

Pressure contours at time, t: (a) 0, (b) 6 μs, (c) 12 μs, (d) 18 μs, (e) 24 μs, (f) 30 μs, (g) 36 μs, and (h) 42 μs

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Figure 10

Snapshot of pressure contours for channel cavity flow

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Figure 11

Snapshot of vorticity contours for channel cavity flow

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Figure 12

Vortex convection velocity as a function of cavity location

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Figure 13

Pressure variation versus frequency at (a) M=0.166 and (b) M=0.183

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Figure 14

Detail of the computational domain for multiple cavity configuration

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Figure 15

Frequency distribution for (a) single cavity, (b) three cavities with 0.5 mm gap, (c) five cavities with 0.5 mm gap, and (d) seven cavities with 0.5 mm gap

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Figure 16

Frequency distribution for five cavities with 1.0 mm gap

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