0
Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Simulation of Instantaneous Heat Transfer in Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines: Unsteady Thermal Boundary Layer Modeling

[+] Author and Article Information
David R. Buttsworth

Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350, Australiadavid.buttsworth@usq.edu.au

Abdalla Agrira, Ray Malpress, Talal Yusaf

Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350, Australia

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 133(2), 022802 (Oct 25, 2010) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001080 History: Received September 25, 2009; Revised October 11, 2009; Published October 25, 2010; Online October 25, 2010

Simulation of internal combustion engine heat transfer using low-dimensional thermodynamic modeling often relies on quasisteady heat transfer correlations. However, unsteady thermal boundary layer modeling could make a useful contribution because of the inherent unsteadiness of the internal combustion engine environment. Previous formulations of the unsteady energy equations for internal combustion engine thermal boundary layer modeling appear to imply that it is necessary to adopt the restrictive assumption that isentropic processes occur in the gas external to the thermal boundary layer. Such restrictions are not required and we have investigated if unsteady modeling can improve the simulation of crank-resolved heat transfer. A modest degree of success is reported for the present modeling, which relies on a constant effective turbulent thermal conductivity. Improvement in the unsteady thermal boundary layer simulations is expected in the future when the temporal and spatial variations in effective turbulent conductivity are correctly modeled.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Pressure variation with crank angle: 6000 rpm, 7 bar BMEP. Symbols: data from Ref. 12; solid line: simulated result.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Heat flux variation with crank angle: 6000 rpm, 7 bar BMEP. Symbols: data from Ref. 12; solid line: simulated result using the Annand model applied to the unburned and burned zones separately.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Heat flux variation with crank angle: 6000 rpm, 7 bar BMEP. Symbols: data from Ref. 12; solid line: simulated result using the Annand model averaged over the unburned and burned zones.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Heat flux variation with crank angle: 6000 rpm, 7 bar BMEP. Symbols: data from Ref. 12; solid line: simulated result using the unsteady energy equation model applied to the unburned and burned zones separately.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Heat flux variation with crank angle: 6000 rpm, 7 bar BMEP. Symbols: data from Ref. 12; solid line: simulated result using the unsteady energy equation model averaged over the unburned and burned zones.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In