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Design Innovation

A Wireless Microwave Telemetry Data Transfer Technique for Reciprocating and Rotating Components

[+] Author and Article Information
Scott A. Miers

 Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439

Glen L. Barna

 IR Telemetrics, Inc., Houghton, MI 49931

Carl L. Anderson, Jason R. Blough, M. Koray Inal

 Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931

Stephen A. Ciatti

 Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 130(2), 025001 (Feb 21, 2008) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2771562 History: Received October 09, 2006; Revised May 23, 2007; Published February 21, 2008

Wireless microwave telemetry addresses the difficult issue of obtaining transducer outputs from reciprocating and rotating components through the use of advanced electronic components. This eliminates the requirements of a direct link between the transducer and the acquisition system. Accuracy of the transducer signal is maintained through the use of a double frequency modulation technique which provides temperature stability and a 20 point calibration of the complete system. Multiple transmitters can be used for larger applications and multiple antennas can be used to improve the signal strength and reduce the possibility of dropouts. Examples of automotive torque converter and piston temperature measurements are provided, showing the effectiveness of the wireless measuring technique.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Wireless telemetry installations

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Figure 2

Typical L-link system schematic

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Figure 3

Telemetry component schematic

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Figure 4

Signal evolution, from transducer to output of receiver

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Figure 5

Electrical connections for determining gain and phase characteristics

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Figure 6

Telemetry gain and phase characteristics

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Figure 7

Coherence function and 60Hz noise

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Figure 8

Temperature calibration schematic

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Figure 9

CFD prediction of static pressures around a stator section at 0.25 S-C. The pump speed is 2000rpm and the charge pressure is 70psi.

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Figure 10

Location of pressure taps on stator blade

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Figure 11

Stator with cover removed to show telemetry electronics installed in the hub

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Figure 12

Fluctuating cavitation number as a function of dimensionless pump speed at SS1, 0.25 S-C

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Figure 13

Thermocouple locations on piston cross section

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Figure 14

Surface thermocouple locations from top view of piston (thermocouples 2, 3, and 4 omitted for clarity)

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Figure 15

Typical piston surface temperature traces: Thermocouple 5, 0deg injector rotation

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Figure 16

Distinct feature in temperature trace: Thermocouple 15, 0deg injector rotation

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Figure 17

Thermocouple 15, injection pulse and cylinder pressure relationship

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Figure 18

dT∕dθ identifies impingement at 1800rpm∕165Nm and 1350rpm∕165Nm: Thermocouple 15, 0deg injector rotation

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Figure 19

Load versues rpm for impinging and nonimpinging conditions

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Figure 20

Comparison of surface heat flux at thermocouple Location 1, for 2D FEM and 1D semi-infinite solutions

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Figure 21

Comparison of surface heat flux at thermocouple Location 5, for 2D FEM and 1D semi-infinite solutions

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Figure 22

Steady-state temperature and heat transfer (%) in a piston cross section

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