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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Modeling Wall Film Formation and Breakup Using an Integrated Interface-Tracking/Discrete-Phase Approach

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Arienti1

 United Technologies Research Center, 411 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06108arientm@utrc.utc.com

L. Wang, M. Corn, X. Li, M. C. Soteriou

 United Technologies Research Center, 411 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06108

T. A. Shedd

 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706

M. Herrmann

 Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 133(3), 031501 (Nov 10, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002019 History: Received April 17, 2010; Revised April 25, 2010; Published November 10, 2010; Online November 10, 2010

We propose a computationally tractable model for film formation and breakup based on data from experiments and direct numerical simulations. This work is a natural continuation of previous studies where primary atomization was modeled based on local flow information from a relatively low-resolution tracking of the liquid interface [Arienti and Soteriou, 2007, “Dynamics of Pulsed Jet in Crossflow,” ASME Paper No. GT2007-27816]. The submodels for film formation proposed here are supported by direct numerical simulations obtained with the refined level set grid method [Herrmann, 2008, “A Balanced Force Refined Level Set Grid Method for Two-Phase Flows on Unstructured Flow Solver Grids,” J. Comput. Phys., 227, pp. 2674–2706]. The overall approach is validated by a carefully designed experiment [Shedd, 2009, “Liquid Jet Breakup by an Impinging Air Jet,” Forty-Seventh AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. Paper No. AIAA-2009-0998], where the liquid jet is crossflow-atomized in a rectangular channel so that a film forms on the wall opposite to the injection orifice. The film eventually breaks up at the downstream exit of the channel. Comparisons with phase Doppler particle analyzer data and with nonintrusive film thickness point measurements complete this study.

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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the major physics of fuel injection and filming in AtoMIST

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Figure 2

(a) Film breakup model schematics (from the top of the film) and (b) snapshot of the film from the experiment (side view)

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Figure 3

(a) Snapshots (15 μs apart) of drop impingement and (b) detailed numerical simulation

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Figure 4

Injector and test section geometry in the experiment

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Figure 5

Setup of high-speed imaging apparatus

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Figure 6

Conceptual description of film thickness measurement

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Figure 7

Midplane cut of the computational grid

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Figure 8

Injection conditions and experiment side view

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Figure 9

Simulation snapshot. Parcels are colored by size from 0 μm to 100 μm. The α=0.5 liquid fraction isosurface is colored by axial velocity from 0 m/s to 50 m/s.

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Figure 10

Case 1 (vjet=12.7 m/s): film thickness along the centerline. The 0 abscissa corresponds to the location of the orifice in the upper wall.

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Figure 11

Drop size and velocity in the transverse direction for case 1. The 0 ordinate corresponds to the location of the filmer wall.

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Figure 12

Case 1 (vjet=17 m/s): film thickness along the centerline. The 0 abscissa corresponds to the location of the orifice in the upper wall.

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Figure 13

Drop size and velocity in the transverse direction for case 2. The 0 ordinate corresponds to the location of the filmer wall.

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