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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Combustion Performance of Liquid Biofuels in a Swirl-Stabilized Burner

[+] Author and Article Information
Daniel Sequera, Ajay K. Agrawal

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487

Scott K. Spear, Daniel T. Daly

Alabama Institute for Manufacturing Excellence, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 130(3), 032810 (Apr 02, 2008) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2836747 History: Received June 20, 2007; Revised June 22, 2007; Published April 02, 2008

Fuels produced from renewable sources offer an economically viable pathway to curtail emissions of greenhouse gases. Two such liquid fuels in common usage are biodiesel and ethanol derived from soybean, corn, or other food crops. In recent years, significant effort has been devoted to identify alternate feedstock sources and conversion techniques to diversify the biofuels portfolio. In this study, we have measured emissions from flames of diesel, biodiesel, emulsified bio-oil, and diesel-biodiesel blends. Experiments are conducted in an atmospheric pressure burner with an air-atomized injector and swirling primary air around it to replicate typical features of a gas turbine combustor. Experiments were conducted for fixed air and fuel flow rates, while the airflow split between the injector and the coflow swirler was varied. Results show a significant reduction in emissions as the fraction of total air fed into the atomizer is increased. Blue flames, reminiscent of premixed combustion, and low emissions of nitric oxides and carbon monoxide were observed for all fuel blends. In general, the emissions from biofuel flames were comparable or lower than those from diesel flames.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 8

Radial profiles of NOx and CO emissions for different AA flow rates; [(a) and (b)] 15% AA, [(c) and (d)] 20% AA, and [(e) and (f)] 25% AA

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Figure 7

Axial Profiles of NOx and CO emissions for different AA flow rates; [(a) and (b)] 15% AA, [(c) and (d)] 20% AA, and [(e) and (f)] 25% AA

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Figure 6

Radial profiles of NOx and CO emissions for different Fuels; [(a) and (b)] diesel, [(c) and (d)] biodiesel and [(e) and (f)] bio-oil

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Figure 5

Axial profiles of NOx and CO emissions for different fuels; [(a) and (b)] diesel, [(c) and (d)] biodiesel and [(e) and (f)] bio-oil

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Figure 4

Effect of AA on visual flame images for different fuels

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Figure 3

Injector details

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Figure 2

Schematic diagram (top) and photograph of the swirler (bottom) at the combustor inlet plane; all dimensions are in cm

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Figure 1

Schematic diagram of the experimental setup; all dimensions are in cm

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