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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Study of Diesel Jet Variability Using Single-Shot X-Ray Radiography

[+] Author and Article Information
A. L. Kastengren1

Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439akastengren@anl.gov

C. F. Powell

Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439

Y.-J. Wang, J. Wang

Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 130(3), 032811 (Apr 03, 2008) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2830861 History: Received October 19, 2007; Revised October 22, 2007; Published April 03, 2008

The variability of diesel jet structure, both as a function of time and between individual injection events, has important implications on the breakup and mixing of the jet. It is accepted that diesel jets become unstable due to interactions with the ambient gas, leading to breakup of the jet. This concept is the principle behind the Kelvin–Helmholtz and Rayleigh–Taylor models of diesel atomization. Very little information regarding diesel jet variability is available, however, in the near-nozzle region of the diesel jet, where primary breakup of the jet occurs. This is due to the presence of many small droplets, which strongly scatter visible light and render the spray opaque. X-ray radiography has been successfully used in recent years to probe the structure of diesel sprays with high spatial and temporal resolutions. All of these previous measurements, however, were ensemble averaged, measuring only persistent features of the spray. In the current study, measurements are performed at individual measurement points of single diesel injection events. These measurements are taken at several points near the injector exit for a nonhydroground nozzle with a single axial hole at two injection pressures (500bars and 1000bars). The variability of the start of injection, end of injection, and the time history of the spray density during the injection event are examined, as well as how these quantities change for different transverse positions across the jet.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Experimental setup

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Figure 2

Measurement positions. The injector orifice diameter and exit plane are shown with the dark box on the left edge of the plot.

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Figure 3

Ensemble-averaged projected density versus time data for x=0.2mm, y=0mm, 500bar injection pressure

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Figure 4

End-of-injection behavior for four injection events at x=0.2mm, y=0, 500bar injection pressure. The ensemble-averaged behavior is shown by the solid line.

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Figure 5

Start of injection behavior for four injection events at x=0.2mm, y=0mm, 500bar injection pressure. The ensemble-averaged behavior is shown by the solid line.

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Figure 6

Start of injection behavior for four injection events at x=2.0mm, y=−0.08mm, 500bar injection pressure. The ensemble-averaged behavior is shown by the solid line.

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Figure 7

End-of-injection behavior for four injection events at x=2.0mm, y=−0.08mm, 500bar injection pressure. The ensemble-averaged behavior is shown by the solid line.

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Figure 8

End-of-injection behavior for four injection events at x=0.2mm, y=0mm, 1000bar injection pressure. The ensemble-averaged behavior is shown by the solid line.

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Figure 9

Variability in the time at which the leading edge passes through radiography measurement locations

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Figure 10

Variability in the time at which the trailing edge passes through radiography measurement locations

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Figure 11

Average autocorrelation coefficient versus time delay for the central region of the 1000μs spray at x=0.2mm, y=0mm

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