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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Characteristics of Particulate Emissions of Compression Ignition Engine Fueled With Biodiesel Derived From Soybean

[+] Author and Article Information
Myung Yoon Kim, Seung Hyun Yoon, Jin Woo Hwang

 Graduate School of Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-Dong, Sungdong-Gu, Seoul 133-791, Korea

Chang Sik Lee1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-Dong, Sungdong-Gu, Seoul 133-791, Koreacslee@hanyang.ac.kr

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 130(5), 052805 (Jun 06, 2008) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2906215 History: Received November 12, 2007; Revised November 13, 2007; Published June 06, 2008

An experimental investigation was performed on the effect of engine speed, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), and boosting intake pressure on the particulate size distribution and exhaust gas emissions in a compression ignition engine fueled with biodiesel derived from soybean. The results obtained by biodiesel fuel were compared to those obtained by petroleum diesel fuel with a sulfur content of 16.3ppm. A scanning mobility particulate sizer was used for size distribution analysis, and it measured mobility equivalent particulate diameter in the range of 10.4392.4nm. In addition to the size distribution of the particulates, exhaust emissions, such as oxides of nitrogen (NOx), hydrocarbon, and carbon monoxide emissions, and combustion characteristics under different engine operating parameters were investigated. The engine operating parameters in terms of engine speed, EGR, and intake pressure were varied to investigate their individual impacts on the combustion and exhaust emission characteristics. As the engine speed was increased for both fuels, the larger size particulates, which dominantly contribute particulate mass, were increased; however, total numbers of particulate were reduced. Compared to diesel fuel, the combustion of biodiesel fuel reduced particulate concentration of relatively larger size where most of the particulate mass is found. Moreover, dramatically lower hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions were found in the biodiesel-fueled engine. However, the NOx emission of the biodiesel-fueled diesel engine shows slightly higher concentration compared to diesel fuel at the same injection timing. EGR significantly increased the larger size particulates, which have diameter near the maximum measurable range of the instrument; however, the total number of particulates was found not to significantly increase with increasing EGR rate for both fuels. Boosting intake pressure shifted the particulate size distribution to smaller particulate diameter and effective reduction of larger size particulate was found for richer operating conditions.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

Injection rate profiles for a constant current pulse width of 700μs and an injection pressure of 50MPa

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Figure 3

Combustion characteristics of biodiesel and diesel fuel (mfuel=8mg, τinj=6deg BTDC, Pinj=50MPa, 1500rpm)

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Figure 4

Particulate size distributions emitted from biodiesel and diesel fuel (mfuel=8mg, τinj=6deg BTDC, Pinj=50MPa, 1500rpm)

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Figure 1

Schematic of experimental apparatus

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Figure 5

Effect of engine speed on the combustion pressure and rate of heat release of biodiesel and diesel fuel (mfuel=8mg, τinj=6deg BTDC, Pinj=50MPa)

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Figure 6

Effect of engine speed on the particulate size distribution and total particulate number and volume emitted (mfuel=8mg, τinj=6deg BTDC, Pinj=50MPa): (a) particulate size distribution; (b) total particulate number and volume

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Figure 7

Effect of engine speed on the CO, HC, NOx, and soot emissions (mfuel=8mg, τinj=6deg BTDC, Pinj=50MPa)

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Figure 8

Effect of EGR on the combustion characteristics of biodiesel and diesel fuel (mfuel=8mg, τinj=6deg BTDC, Pinj=100MPa)

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Figure 9

Effect of EGR on the particulate size distribution for biodiesel and diesel fuel (mfuel=8mg, τinj=6deg BTDC, Pinj=100MPa)

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Figure 10

Sensitivity of particulate size classes to 30% of EGR (mfuel=8mg, τinj=6deg BTDC, Pinj=100MPa)

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Figure 11

Effect of supercharging on the particulate size distribution for biodiesel fuel (Pinj=100MPa, τinj=4deg BTDC): (a) mfuel=8mg∕cycle; (b) mfuel=12mg∕cycle

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