0
Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Real-Time IMEP Estimation and Control Using an In-Cylinder Pressure Sensor for a Common-Rail Direct Injection Diesel Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
Seungsuk Oh

Department of Automotive Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791, Republic of Koreaseungsukoh@gmail.com

Junsoo Kim

Department of Automotive Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791, Republic of Koreajunskys@gmail.com

Byounggul Oh

Department of Automotive Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791, Republic of Koreaobgg@hanyang.ac.kr

Kangyoon Lee

Department of Automotive Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791, Republic of Koreabbikeman@gmail.com

Myoungho Sunwoo1

Department of Automotive Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791, Republic of Koreamsunwoo@hanyang.ac.kr

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 133(6), 062801 (Feb 14, 2011) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002250 History: Received December 15, 2009; Revised July 16, 2010; Published February 14, 2011; Online February 14, 2011

An in-cylinder pressure-based control method is capable of improving engine performance, as well as reducing harmful emissions. However, this method is difficult to be implemented in a conventional engine management system due to the excessive data acquisition and long computation time. In this study, we propose a real-time indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) estimation method using cylinder pressure in a common-rail direct injection diesel engine. In this method, difference pressure integral (DPI) was applied to the estimation. The DPI requires only 180 pressure data points during one engine cycle from top dead center to bottom dead center when pressure data are captured at every crank angle. Therefore, the IMEP can be estimated in real time. To further reduce the computational load, the IMEP was also estimated using DPI at 2 deg, 3 deg, and 4 deg crank angle resolutions. Furthermore, based on the estimated IMEP, we controlled IMEP using a radial basis function network and linear feedback controller. As a result of the study, successful estimation and control were demonstrated through engine experiments.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

IMEP with respect to DPI (2000 rpm, fuel-rail pressure of 600 bars, waste gate fully opened, without EGR)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Lookup tables for the coefficient of estimation equation

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Experimental setup

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Offline IMEP estimation experimental results (fuel-rail pressure of 600 bars, waste gate fully opened, without EGR)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Online IMEP estimation experimental results

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

The number of pressure data captures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Computation time

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Schematic of IMEP estimation and control system

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

IMEP control results

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In