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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Measurement of Biodiesel Blend and Conventional Diesel Spray Structure Using X-Ray Radiography

[+] Author and Article Information
A. L. Kastengren1

Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439akastengren@anl.gov

C. F. Powell

Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439

K.-S. Im, Y.-J. Wang, J. Wang

Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 131(6), 062802 (Jul 14, 2009) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3094023 History: Received July 15, 2008; Revised July 15, 2008; Published July 14, 2009

The near-nozzle structure of several nonevaporating biodiesel-blend sprays has been studied using X-ray radiography. Radiography allows quantitative measurements of the fuel distribution in sprays to be made with high temporal and spatial resolution. Measurements have been made at different values of injection pressure, ambient density, and with two different nozzle geometries to understand the influences of these parameters on the spray structure of the biodiesel blend. These measurements have been compared with corresponding measurements of Viscor, a diesel calibration fluid, to demonstrate the fuel effects on the spray structure. Generally, the biodiesel-blend spray has a similar structure to the spray of Viscor. For the nonhydroground nozzle used in this study, the biodiesel-blend spray has a slightly slower penetration into the ambient gas than the Viscor spray. The cone angle of the biodiesel-blend spray is generally smaller than that of the Viscor spray, indicating that the biodiesel-blend spray is denser than the Viscor spray. For the hydroground nozzle, both fuels produce sprays with initially wide cone angles that transition to narrow sprays during the steady-state portion of the injection event. These variations in cone angle with time occur later for the biodiesel-blend spray than for the Viscor spray, indicating that the dynamics of the injector needle as it opens are somewhat different for the two fuels.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Biodiesel-blend spray behavior for the hydroground nozzle 67 μs after SOI; rail pressure=1000 bar and ambient pressure=20 bar

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Figure 3

Biodiesel-blend spray behavior for the hydroground nozzle 612 μs after SOI; rail pressure=1000 bar and ambient pressure=20 bar

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Figure 4

Biodiesel-blend spray behavior for the hydroground nozzle 1423 μs after SOI; rail pressure=1000 bar and ambient pressure=20 bar

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Figure 5

Biodiesel-blend spray behavior for the hydroground nozzle 612 μs after SOI; rail pressure=1000 bar and ambient pressure=5 bar

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Figure 6

Biodiesel-blend spray behavior for the nonhydroground nozzle 67 μs after SOI; rail pressure=1000 bar and ambient pressure=20 bar

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Figure 7

Biodiesel-blend spray behavior for the nonhydroground nozzle 612 μs after SOI; rail pressure=1000 bar and ambient pressure=20 bar

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Figure 11

Example FWHM data during the steady-state part of the spray for the nonhydroground (1000 bar rail pressure) and hydroground (500 bar rail pressure) nozzles. The ambient pressure in both cases was 20 bar.

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Figure 12

Cone angle versus time for selected measurements with the hydroground nozzle. For clarity, only every fifth point is displayed.

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Figure 13

Cone angle versus time for selected measurements with the nonhydroground nozzle. For clarity, only every fifth point is displayed.

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Figure 14

Steady-state cone angle versus ambient density for the hydroground nozzle

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Figure 15

Steady-state cone angle versus ambient density for the nonhydroground nozzle

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Figure 10

Penetration versus time for the nonhydroground nozzle. The filled symbols represent biodiesel-blend data; the open symbols represent Viscor data.

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Figure 9

Penetration versus time for the hydroground nozzle. The filled symbols represent biodiesel-blend data; the open symbols represent Viscor data.

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Figure 8

Viscor spray behavior for the hydroground nozzle 612 μs after SOI; rail pressure=1000 bar and ambient pressure=20 bar

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Figure 2

Biodiesel-blend spray behavior for the hydroground nozzle 182 μs after SOI; rail pressure=1000 bar and ambient pressure=20 bar

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