0
Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Investigation of Mixture Preparation Effects on Gasoline HCCI Combustion Aided by Measurements of Wall Heat Flux

[+] Author and Article Information
Junseok Chang

 General Motors Research and Development, 30500 Mound Road, Warren, MI 48090junseok.chang@gm.com

Zoran S. Filipi

 University of Michigan, 2031 W.E. Lay Automotive Laboratory, 1231 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109filipi@umich.edu

Tang-Wei Kuo

 General Motors Research and Development, 30500 Mound Road, Warren, MI 48090tang-wei.kuo@gm.com

Dennis N. Assanis

 University of Michigan, 2236 G.G. Brown, 2350 Hayward Street, Arbor, MI 48109assanis@umich.edu

Paul M. Najt

 General Motors Research and Development, 30500 Mound Road, Warren, MI 48090paul.m.najt@gm.com

Rodney B. Rask

 General Motors Research and Development, 30500 Mound Road, Warren, MI 48090raskrl@aol.com

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 130(6), 062806 (Aug 21, 2008) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2943194 History: Received February 04, 2008; Revised February 22, 2008; Published August 21, 2008

Expanding the range of HCCI operation will be critical for maximizing the fuel economy benefits in future vehicle applications. The mixture stratification, both thermal and compositional, can have very tangible impact on HCCI combustion, and gaining a deeper insight into these effects is critical for expanding the HCCI range of operation. This paper presents results of the comprehensive experimental investigation of the mixture preparation effects on a single-cylinder gasoline HCCI engine with exhaust reinduction. The effects include the type of mixture preparation (external mixing versus direct injection), charge motion, and injection timing. A combination of pressure-based combustion diagnostics, emission analysis, and heat flux measurements on the combustion chamber wall quantifies the effects on combustion and provides insight into reasons for observed engine behavior. As an example, the instantaneous temperature and heat flux measurements show the fuel impingement locations and allow assessing the fuel film dynamics and their effect on mixture stratification. The effects of direct injection and partial closing of the swirl control valve are relatively small compared with extending the injection timing late into the intake process or completely closing the swirl control valve and allowing charge storage in the intake port.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic of the HCCI engine setup

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Heat flux measurement instrumentation: (a) locations of heat flux probes and (b) mechanical linkage telemetry system

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

FP versus DI fuel charge comparisons with respect to varying SCV: Performance and mass fraction burn locations

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

FP versus DI fuel charge comparisons with respect to varying SCV: engine-out emissions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Instantaneous local surface temperature (100cycle ensemble average) comparison with different SCV settings: FP versus DI charge preparation

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Instantaneous local heat flux (100cycle ensemble average) comparison with different SCV settings: FP versus DI charge preparation

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Effect of injection timing on HCCI combustion stability, burn locations, and emissions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Instantaneous local heat flux (100cycle ensemble average) comparison with varying injection timing

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Heat release rate comparison with respect to varying SCV setting

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Effect of SCV setting on the head surface heat flux at location h1 during (a) intake and (b) exhaust event

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In