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Research Papers: Nuclear Power

Corrosion of the Materials in Sulfuric Acid

[+] Author and Article Information
Hong Pyo Kim, Hyuk Chul Kwon, Ji Yeon Park, Yong Wan Kim

 Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353, Korea

Dong-Jin Kim1

 Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353, Koreadjink@kaeri.re.kr

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 131(4), 042904 (Apr 16, 2009) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3095808 History: Received October 22, 2008; Revised October 23, 2008; Published April 16, 2009

A program for a hydrogen production by using a high temperature nuclear heat has been launched in Korea since 2004. Iodine sulfur (IS) process is one of the promising processes for a hydrogen production because it does not generate carbon dioxide and a massive hydrogen production may be possible. However, the highly corrosive environment of the process is a barrier to its application in the industry. Therefore, corrosion behaviors of various materials were evaluated in sulfuric acid to select appropriate materials compatible with the IS process. The materials used in this work were Ni based alloys, Fe–Si alloys, Ta, Au, Pt, Zr, SiC, and so on. The test environments were boiling 50wt% sulfuric acid without/with HI as an impurity and 98wt% sulfuric acid. The surface morphologies and cross-sectional areas of the corroded materials were examined by using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). From the results of the weight loss and potentiodynamic experiments, it was found that a Si enriched oxide is attributable to a corrosion resistance for materials including Si in boiling 98wt% sulfuric acid. Moreover, the passive Si enriched film thickness increased with the immersion time leading to an enhancement of the corrosion resistance. Corrosion behaviors of the material tested are discussed in terms of the chemical composition of the materials, the corrosion morphology, and the surface layer’s composition.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Micrographs obtained from SEM for the specimens in 50 wt % sulfuric acid

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Figure 2

Micrographs obtained from SEM for the specimens in 50 wt % sulfuric acid with 0.5 mol HI

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Figure 3

Micrographs obtained from SEM for the specimens in 98 wt % sulfuric acid

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Figure 4

(a) Corrosion rate for SiC obtained as a function of the immersion test duration and (b) that for Fe–Si alloys obtained as a function of the Si content in boiling 98 wt % sulfuric acid

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Figure 5

Micrographs obtained from SEM for the SiC in boiling 98 wt % sulfuric acid after (a) 10 day immersion, (b) 30 day immersion, and (c) 60 day immersion

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Figure 6

Potentiodynamic curves for Fe–6Si, Fe–10Si, and Fe–13Si in 50 wt % sulfuric acid at room temperature with a scan rate of 5 mV/s

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Figure 7

Micrographs obtained from SEM for the Fe–6Si (a) without and (b) with thermal treatment in boiling 98 wt % sulfuric acid, respectively

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Figure 8

Micrograph obtained from SEM for the Fe-6Si with thermal treatment after a 30 day immersion in boiling 98 wt % sulfuric acid

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Figure 9

Chemical composition as a function of the depth of a passive layer

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