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Research Papers: Nuclear Power

Dynamics Simulations of a Graphite Block Under Longitudinal Impact

[+] Author and Article Information
Gyeongho Kim

 Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Daejeon 305-353, Koreaghokim@kaeri.re.kr

Dong Ok Kim

 Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Daejeon 305-353, Koreadokim@kaeri.re.kr

Woo-Seok Choi

 Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Daejeon 305-353, Koreawschoi@kaeri.re.kr

Ji Ho Kang

 Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Daejeon 305-353, Koreajhkang@kaeri.re.kr

Jae Man Noh

 Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Daejeon 305-353, Koreajmnoh@kaeri.re.kr

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 133(5), 052901 (Dec 09, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002352 History: Received June 29, 2010; Revised July 01, 2010; Published December 09, 2010; Online December 09, 2010

Graphite blocks are important core components of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor. As these blocks are simply stacked in array, collisions among neighboring components may occur during earthquakes or accidents. Thus, it is important to develop a reliable seismic model of the stacked graphite blocks and have them designed to maintain their structural integrity during the anticipated occurrences. Various aspects involved in modeling and calculating impact-contact dynamics can affect the resulting behavior of the graphite block. These include mesh size, time step, contact behavior, mechanical constraint formulation of impact-contact analysis, etc. This work is dedicated to perform comparative studies and the effects of these parameters will be identified. The insights obtained through these studies will help build a realistic impact-contact model of the graphite block from which a lumped or reduced dynamics model will be developed for the seismic analysis of the reactor including these graphite components.

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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Graphite block and its dimensions

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Figure 2

Graphite block undergoing a longitudinal impact against a rigid plate

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Figure 3

Surface partition for generating a regular mesh: 1

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Figure 4

Mesh models generated from partition 1: (a) 720, (b) 4200, and (c) 26,640 elements

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Figure 5

Mode shapes of interest: (a) first, (b) second, and (c) third modes

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Figure 6

Surface partition for generating a regular mesh: 2

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Figure 7

Mesh models generated from partition 2: (a) 720, (b) 3000, (c) 19,440, and (d) 124,416 elements

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Figure 8

Free falling analysis of models with various mesh sizes

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Figure 9

Impact-contact analysis

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Figure 10

Displacement of the 5 points during the impact

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Figure 11

Contact pressure of the point P1 during the impact

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Figure 12

Stress distribution right after the impact

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Figure 13

Effects of time step on the impact-contact analysis

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Figure 14

Time histories of the contact pressure at P1 for three different initial velocities

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Figure 15

Time histories of the contact pressures at P1 for four different mesh models

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Figure 16

Surface layers of metal

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Figure 17

Exponential contact behavior

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Figure 18

Comparison of the contact pressure; hard contact versus exponential contact

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Figure 19

Comparison of the displacement at P1; hard contact versus exponential contact

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