0
Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Detailed Numerical Simulations of the Primary Atomization of a Turbulent Liquid Jet in Crossflow

[+] Author and Article Information
Marcus Herrmann

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287marcus.herrmann@asu.edu

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 132(6), 061506 (Mar 30, 2010) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000148 History: Received May 05, 2009; Revised May 06, 2009; Published March 30, 2010

This paper presents numerical simulation results of the primary atomization of a turbulent liquid jet injected into a gaseous crossflow. Simulations are performed using the balanced force refined level set grid method. The phase interface during the initial breakup phase is tracked by a level set method on a separate refined grid. A balanced force finite volume algorithm together with an interface projected curvature evaluation is used to ensure the stable and accurate treatment of surface tension forces even on small scales. Broken off, small scale nearly spherical drops are transferred into a Lagrangian point particle description allowing for full two-way coupling and continued secondary atomization. The numerical method is applied to the simulation of the primary atomization region of a turbulent liquid jet (q=6.6,We=330,Re=14,000) injected into a gaseous crossflow (Re=570,000), analyzed experimentally by Brown and McDonell (2006, “Near Field Behavior of a Liquid Jet in a Crossflow,” ILASS Americas, 19th Annual Conference on Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems). The simulations take the actual geometry of the injector into account. Grid converged simulation results of the jet penetration agree well with experimentally obtained correlations. Both column/bag breakup and shear/ligament breakup modes can be observed on the liquid jet. A grid refinement study shows that on the finest employed grids (flow solver 64 points per injector diameter, level set solver 128 points per injector diameter), grid converged drop sizes are achieved for drops as small as one-hundredth the size of the injector diameter.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

RLSG grid structure

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Computational domain and boundary conditions (left) and mesh detail near the injector (right)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Zoom of the instantaneous axial velocity distribution in the injector midplane

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Instantaneous injector exit plane velocity distributions. From left to right: crossflow direction, axial direction, and transverse direction.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Temporal evolution of tracked liquid mass for different grid resolutions: case c01 (left), c12 (center), and c23 (right)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Impact of grid resolution on averaged side view of the liquid jet; case c01 (left), c12 (center), and c23 (right). Jet penetration is compared with correlations due to Wu (8) (upper curve) and Stenzler (4) (lower curve).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Side view snapshots of jet in crossflow atomization at t=5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 28.1 time units (top to bottom); case c01 (left), c12 (center), and c23 (right)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Front view snapshots of jet in crossflow atomization at t=5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 28.1 time units (top to bottom); case c01 (left), c12 (center), and c23 (right)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Top view snapshots of jet in crossflow atomization at t=5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 28.1 time units (top to bottom); case c01 (left), c12 (center), and c23 (right)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Grid convergence study of pfd of drop diameters d generated directly by primary atomization: case c01 (open circles), c12 (open triangles), and c23 (solid squares). Solid line is log-normal fit to large drop sizes on finest grid.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In