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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Cycle Innovations

Application of the Geared Turbofan With Constant Volume Combustor on Short-Range Aircraft: A Feasibility Study

[+] Author and Article Information
Ramón F. Colmenares Quintero

School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL, UK e-mail: r.f.colmenaresquintero@cranfield.ac.uk Gas Turbine Engineering Group, Aeronautical Engineering Programme, Faculty of Engineering, Universidad de San Buenaventura, Carrera 8H No. 172-20, Bogotá, Colombiagtegroup@docentes.usbbog.edu.co

Rob Brink

School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL, UKrob.brink@gmail.com

Stephen Ogaji

School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL, UKs.ogaji@cranfield.ac.uk

Pericle Pilidis

School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL, UKp.pilidis@cranfield.ac.uk

Juan C. Colmenares Quintero

Department of Chemistry, Olah and Prakash Group, Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute, University of Southern California, 837 Bloom Walk, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1661 e-mail: jcarlos@wp.pl Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01–224 Warszawa, Polandjcarlos@ichf.edu.pl

Alexander García Quintero

Faculty of Industrial Engineering, Escuela Colombiana de Carreras Industriales, Cra. 19 No. 49-20, Bogotá, Colombiabetolisto1@hotmail.com

Optimized for fuel burn, cruise SFC, NOx, noise, and engine DOC.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 132(6), 061702 (Mar 24, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000135 History: Received April 15, 2009; Revised April 21, 2009; Published March 24, 2010; Online March 24, 2010

Recently a considerable effort was made to understand the gas- and thermodynamics of wave rotor combustion technology. Pressure-gain combustors potentially have superior performance over conventional combustors due to their unsteady flow behavior. Wave rotor combustion provides semiconstant volume combustion and could be integrated in the steady-flow gas turbine. However, a feasibility study to assess the economical and environmental aspects of this concept has not been conducted for short-range missions. Preliminary multidisciplinary design framework was developed to assess novel and radical engine cycles. The tool comprises modules to evaluate noise, emissions, and environmental impact. Uncertainty can be accounted for with Monte Carlo simulation. The geared turbofan with constant volume combustor is simulated and benchmarked against a baseline geared turbofan engine. Results indicate that the former complies with CAEP/6 and FAR Part 36 regulations for noise and emissions. Furthermore, the acquisition cost of the engine is higher, but the engine direct operating cost decreases by 25.2%. The technology requires further development to meet future noise and emission requirements.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Roadmap optimization study

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Figure 2

Overview of PMDF

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Figure 3

Parametric study of nondimensional block fuel and LTO NOx versus BPR (FPR=1.45, OPR=38.6, and TET=1650 K)

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Figure 4

Parametric study of nondimensional block fuel and engine DOC versus BPR (FPR=1.45, OPR=38.6, and TET=1650 K)

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Figure 5

Parametric study of nondimensional EPNL versus BPR

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Figure 6

Parametric study of nondimensional SFC versus BPR (FPR=1.45, OPR=38.6, and TET=1650 K)

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Figure 7

Single-objective optimization for minimum fuel burn (BPR=7.5, FPR=1.45, OPR=53.9, and TET=1650 K)

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Figure 8

Single-objective optimization for minimum NOx emissions (BPR=5.5, FPR=1.45, OPR=30.0, and TET=1650 K)

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Figure 9

Single-objective optimization for minimum cruise SFC/noise (BPR=8.5, FPR=1.45, OPR=54.0, and TET=1650 K)

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Figure 10

Single-objective optimization for minimum engine DOC (BPR=5.8, FPR=1.45, OPR=54.0, and TET=1650 K)

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Figure 11

Multi-objective optimization for FB versus NOx versus cruise SFC versus noise versus engine DOC (BPR=6.9, FPR=1.46, OPR=41.6, and TET=1650 K)

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Figure 12

Cumulative curve EDOC

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Figure 13

Breakdown of the engine DOC for the baseline GTF

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Figure 14

Breakdown of the engine DOC for the GTF CVC

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Figure 15

Pareto front nondimensional FB versus NOx

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Figure 16

Pareto front nondimensional FB/noise versus EDOC

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