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Technical Briefs

Comparative Performance, Emission, and Combustion Characteristics of Rice-Bran Oil and Its Biodiesel in a Transportation Diesel Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
Avinash Kumar Agarwal1

Engine Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016, Indiaakag@iitk.ac.in

Atul Dhar

Engine Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016, India

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 132(6), 064503 (Mar 24, 2010) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000143 History: Received April 30, 2009; Revised May 14, 2009; Published March 24, 2010; Online March 24, 2010

The methyl esters of vegetable oils known as biodiesel are becoming increasingly popular because of their low environmental impact and potential as a green alternative fuel for diesel engines. Methyl ester of rice-bran oil (RBOME) is prepared through the process of transesterification. In the present investigation, experiments have been carried out to examine the performance, emission, and combustion characteristics of a direct-injection transportation diesel engine running with diesel, 20% blend of rice-bran oil (RBO), and 20% blend of RBOME with mineral diesel. A four-stroke, four-cylinder, direct-injection transportation diesel engine (MDI 3000) was instrumented for the measurement of the engine performance, emissions, in-cylinder pressure-crank angle history, rate of pressure rise, and other important combustion parameters such as instantaneous heat release rate, cumulative heat release rate, mass fraction burned, etc. A careful analysis of the performance, emissions, combustion, and heat release parameters has been carried out. HC, CO, and smoke emissions for RBO and RBOME blends were lower than mineral diesel while NOx emissions were almost similar and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) was slightly higher than mineral diesel. Combustion characteristics were quite similar for the three fuels.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

BSFC and thermal efficiency at 1800 rpm

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Figure 2

Smoke opacity and exhaust temperature at 1800 rpm

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Figure 3

CO2 and NOx emissions at 1800 rpm

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Figure 4

CO and HC emissions at 1800 rpm

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Figure 5

Comparison of in-cylinder pressure and heat release rate variation at no load condition

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Figure 6

Comparison of in-cylinder pressure and heat release rate variation at full load condition

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Figure 7

Comparison of cumulative heat release rate variation at idle and full load conditions

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Figure 8

Crank angle for 10% and 90% mass burns at 1800 rpm

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