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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Optical Investigation Into Wall Wetting From Late-Cycle Post-Injections Used for Diesel Particulate Filter Regeneration

[+] Author and Article Information
Goran Bozic, Sanghoon Kook

 University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia

Isaac W. Ekoto, Ben R. Petersen, Paul C. Miles

 Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 133(9), 092803 (Apr 15, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002917 History: Received October 04, 2010; Revised October 25, 2010; Published April 15, 2011; Online April 15, 2011

Wall wetting phenomena were investigated in a light-duty diesel optical engine, operating under typical diesel particulate filter regeneration conditions, through the use of liquid spray imaging during late-cycle post-injections. Three post-injection timings were explored: (1) an “early” timing (44.5 deg after top dead center (aTDC)) where high ambient temperatures and densities were expected to decrease the liquid penetration, (2) a “conventional” timing (78.5 deg aTDC) that is typically used to produce the necessary aftertreatment regeneration exhaust conditions, and (3) a “late” timing (133.5 deg aTDC) where in-cylinder flows generated by exhaust valve opening-induced blowdown can disrupt the liquid penetration. In addition to a 2007 U.S. certification diesel fuel, a palm-derived B20 biodiesel blend and a soy-derived B100 biodiesel were examined since liquid spray impingement is thought to worsen for biodiesel blends due to higher fuel distillation temperature, density, and viscosity. No significant wall wetting was observed for the early post-injection. However, considerable impingement occurred for the conventional and late post-injections. Liquid penetration and persistence of liquid fuel in the cylinder were found to increase with biodiesel content, while exhaust blowdown flows were ineffective in reducing the severity of wall wetting. Negligible distortion of jet structure was observed for the liquid spray at the late post-injection. Short pulse durations decreased the severity of liquid penetration with the soy-derived biodiesel during the early post-injection but were otherwise ineffective.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Cross-section of the optical engine and schematic representation of the experimental setup

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Figure 2

Bulk gas temperature and density traces for the regeneration condition and its surrogate

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Figure 3

Distillation curves for the three fuels used in the present study. The PME20 blend distillation curve was estimated following the procedure used by Petersen (14).

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Figure 4

The spray is segmented due to the shape of the piston as viewed from below

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Figure 5

Single spray images with a short (3.3 mg/injection) injection at SOI 44.5 deg aTDC

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Figure 6

Single spray images with a long (5.1 mg/injection) injection at SOI 44.5 deg aTDC

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Figure 7

Single spray images with a short (3.3 mg/injection) injection at SOI 78.5 deg aTDC

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Figure 8

Single spray images with a long (5.1 mg/injection) injection at SOI 78.5 deg aTDC

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Figure 9

Single spray images with a short (3.3 mg/injection) injection at SOI 133.5 deg aTDC

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Figure 10

Single spray images with a long (5.1 mg/injection) injection at SOI 133.5 deg aTDC

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