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Technical Briefs

Modeling of the Constitutive Behavior of Inconel 718 at Intermediate Temperatures

[+] Author and Article Information
D. Gustafsson1

Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Solid Mechanics, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping, Swedendavid.gustafsson@liu.se

J. J. Moverare

 Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, SE-61283 Finspång, Swedenjohan.moverare@siemens.se

K. Simonsson

Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Solid Mechanics, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping, Swedenkjell.simonsson@liu.se

S. Sjöström

Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Solid Mechanics, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping, Swedensoren.sjostrom@liu.se

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 133(9), 094501 (Apr 14, 2011) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002913 History: Received June 17, 2010; Revised October 06, 2010; Published April 14, 2011; Online April 14, 2011

Turbine disks are of large importance to turbine designers as they are exposed to hot environment and subjected to high loads. In order to analyze such components with respect to fatigue crack initiation, the work generally starts with a rigorous analysis of the first few cycles, during which an important stress redistribution will always take place in an inelastic structure. In this work, the nonlinear kinematic hardening law by Ohno and Wang (1998, “Constitutive Modeling of Cyclic Plasticity With Emphasis on Ratchetting,” Int. J. Mech. Sci., 40, pp. 251–261) has been used in combination with an isotropic softening law for describing the initial stress-strain distribution for strain controlled uniaxial tests of the material Inconel 718. Focus has been placed on finding a simple model with few material parameters and to describe the initial softening and the comparatively small mean stress relaxation observed during the material testing. The simulation results obtained by using the model fit the experimental results well.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Stress-strain curves for the tests

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Figure 2

Mean stress for the tests

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Figure 3

Stress range for the tests

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Figure 4

Comparison between model and test data

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