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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Biodiesel Effects on Influencing Parameters of Brake Fuel Conversion Efficiency in a Medium Duty Diesel Engine

[+] Author and Article Information
Joshua A. Bittle, Jesse K. Younger

 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-3123

Timothy J. Jacobs1

 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-3123tjjacobs@tamu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 132(12), 122801 (Aug 27, 2010) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001086 History: Received November 13, 2009; Revised December 09, 2009; Published August 27, 2010; Online August 27, 2010

Biodiesel remains an alternative fuel of interest for use in diesel engines. A common characteristic of biodiesel, relative to petroleum diesel, is a lowered heating value (or per mass energy content of the fuel). For same torque engine comparisons, the lower heating value translates into a higher brake specific fuel consumption (amount of fuel consumed per unit of power produced). The efficiency at which fuel energy converts into work energy, however, may remain unchanged. In this experimental study, evaluating nine unique engine operating conditions, the brake fuel conversion efficiency (an assessor of fuel energy to work energy efficiency) remains unchanged between 100% petroleum diesel fuel and 100% biodiesel fuel (palm olein) at all conditions, except for high load conditions. Several parameters may affect the brake fuel conversion efficiency, including heat loss, mixture properties, pumping work, friction, combustion efficiency, and combustion timing. This article describes a study that evaluates how the aforementioned parameters may change with the use of biodiesel and petroleum diesel, and how these parameters may result in differences in the brake fuel conversion efficiency.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

(a) Brake fuel conversion efficiency (ηf,b), (b) fuel energy delivery rate (i.e., mfQLHV), and (c) IMEPnet as functions of engine speed at the nine operating points under study

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Figure 2

Heat transfer rate as a function of engine crankangle at (a) low , (b) mid, and (c) high load conditions. Each plot shows both biodiesel and reference diesel rates at each of the three operating speeds.

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Figure 3

Heat release rate as a function of engine crank angle for biodiesel at 1400 rev/min, low , mid, and high load conditions. Data shown to illustrate the increasing level of diffusion burn (i.e., increasing extent of radiation heat transfer) as engine load increases.

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Figure 4

(a) Fuel-air ratio and (b) EGR level as functions of engine speed at the nine operating points under study

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Figure 5

(a) PMEP and (b) FMEP as functions of engine speed at the nine operating points under study

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Figure 6

CO concentration as a function of engine speed at the nine operating points under study. Load labels correspond to reference fuel data points.

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Figure 7

Crank angle locations of (a) start of combustion, (b) start of pilot injection, and (c) start of main injection at the nine operating conditions under study

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Figure 8

Ignition delay as a function of engine speed at (a) low , (b) mid, and (c) high load operating conditions under study

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