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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Heat Transfer

Numerical Study of Aerodynamic Losses of Effusion Cooling Holes in Aero-Engine Combustor Liners

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Andreini

Dipartimento di Energetica “Sergio Stecco”, University of Florence–Italy, Via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence, Italyantonio.andreini@htc.de.unifi.it

A. Bonini, G. Caciolli, B. Facchini

Dipartimento di Energetica “Sergio Stecco”, University of Florence–Italy, Via Santa Marta 3, 50139 Florence, Italy

S. Taddei

Combustion System, AVIO Group S.p.A., 10040 Rivalta (TO), Italysimone.taddei@aviogroup.com

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 133(2), 021901 (Oct 29, 2010) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002040 History: Received May 04, 2010; Revised May 28, 2010; Published October 29, 2010; Online October 29, 2010

Due to the stringent cooling requirements of novel aero-engines combustor liners, a comprehensive understanding of the phenomena concerning the interaction of hot gases with typical coolant jets plays a major role in the design of efficient cooling systems. In this work, an aerodynamic analysis of the effusion cooling system of an aero-engine combustor liner was performed; the aim was the definition of a correlation for the discharge coefficient (CD) of the single effusion hole. The data were taken from a set of CFD RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) simulations, in which the behavior of the effusion cooling system was investigated over a wide range of thermo/fluid-dynamics conditions. In some of these tests, the influence on the effusion flow of an additional air bleeding port was taken into account, making it possible to analyze its effects on effusion holes CD. An in depth analysis of the numerical data set has pointed out the opportunity of an efficient reduction through the ratio of the annulus and the hole Reynolds numbers: The dependence of the discharge coefficients from this parameter is roughly linear. The correlation was included in an in-house one-dimensional thermo/fluid network solver, and its results were compared with CFD data. An overall good agreement of pressure and mass flow rate distributions was observed. The main source of inaccuracy was observed in the case of relevant air bleed mass flow rates due to the inherent three-dimensional behavior of the flow close to bleed opening. An additional comparison with experimental data was performed in order to improve the confidence in the accuracy of the correlation: Within the validity range of pressure ratios in which the correlation is defined (>1.02), this comparison pointed out a good reliability in the prediction of discharge coefficients. An approach to model air bleeding was then proposed, with the assessment of its impact on liner wall temperature prediction.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Scheme of the cooling system

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Figure 2

Reference sections for the evaluation of CD

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Figure 3

Single hole validation test case: sketch of the computational domain; mesh detail

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Figure 4

Single hole validation test case: comparison between experimental (6) and numerical values of CD

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Figure 5

Sketch of the computational domain: (a) boundary conditions and (b) computational mesh

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Figure 6

Trend of the discharge coefficients; no_bleed: (a) outer annulus and (b) inner annulus; bleed: (c) outer annulus and (d) inner annulus

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Figure 7

Discharge coefficients versus Reynolds ratio; no_bleed: (a) outer annulus and (b) inner annulus; bleed: (c) outer annulus and (d) inner annulus

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Figure 8

Relative errors between CD predicted and extracted from CFD

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Figure 9

No_bleed, case engine: comparisons between the correlation and the values extracted from CFD; (a) outer annulus and (b) inner annulus

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Figure 10

Bleed, case cruise: comparisons between the correlation and the values extracted from CFD; (a) outer annulus and (b) inner annulus

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Figure 11

The two models for the bleeding system: (a) previous model and (b) new model

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Figure 12

Annulus mass flow: comparisons between different models: (a) outer annulus and (b) inner annulus

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Figure 13

No_bleed, case engine: comparisons between the CFD, the correlation and values predicted by SRBC; (a) outer annulus and (b) inner annulus

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Figure 14

Bleed, case cruise: comparisons between the CFD, the correlation and values predicted by SRBC; (a) outer annulus and (b) inner annulus

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Figure 17

Nusselt number along the inner liner

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Figure 16

Temperature profile along the inner liner

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Figure 15

Comparison between experiments and numerical results

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