0
Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Heat Transfer

Hot Streak Migration in a Turbine Stage: Integrated Design to Improve Aerothermal Performance

[+] Author and Article Information
Altug M. Basol1

Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Laboratory for Energy Conversion, ETH Zurich, Zurich CH-8092 Switzerlandbasola@lec.mavt.ethz.ch

Philipp Jenny

Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Laboratory for Energy Conversion, ETH Zurich, Zurich CH-8092 Switzerlandjenny@lec.mavt.ethz.ch

Mohamed Ibrahim

Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Laboratory for Energy Conversion, ETH Zurich, Zurich CH-8092 Switzerlandibrahim@lec.mavt.ethz.ch

Anestis I. Kalfas

School of Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 52124 Thessaloniki, Greeceakalfas@auth.gr

Reza S. Abhari

Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Laboratory for Energy Conversion, ETH Zurich, Zurich CH-8092, Switzerlandabhari@lec.mavt.ethz.ch

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 133(6), 061901 (Feb 17, 2011) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002349 History: Received May 29, 2010; Revised June 25, 2010; Published February 17, 2011; Online February 17, 2011

Hot streaks can cause localized hot spots on the blade surfaces in a high pressure turbine, increasing the heat load locally and even leading to material loss in regions such as the rotor blade tip. This study explores numerically the effect of the hot streak’s clocking position at the stator inlet on the rotor blade heat load and on the tip in particular. The inlet boundary conditions are taken from the hot streak experiment conducted in the axial turbine facility “LISA” at ETH Zurich. Using a particle tracking tool, in conjunction with time resolved simulations, a detailed analysis of the migration pattern of the hot streak is performed and the underlying mechanisms are discussed. The effect of clocking the hot streak from midpitch to the stator pressure side and in the opposite direction is examined. By clocking this particular hot streak even 10% of the stator pitch toward the pressure side up to 24 K reduction in the rotor blade tip adiabatic wall temperatures could be achieved under realistic engine conditions. Finally, based on the observations made, the implications for an integrated combustor-turbine design strategy are discussed.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

The layout of the measurement planes and the hot streak generator

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Absolute total temperature distribution for the low temperature hot streak case measured upstream of the stator 1 (A-plane) and deviation of the total pressure from the mean

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

The wall mesh of the fine grid

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

The variation in pressure at the stator-rotor interface at one of the monitoring points

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Circumferentially mass averaged relative total pressure coefficients for different mesh sizes

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Comparison of the time averaged relative total temperatures downstream of the rotor (C-plane): measurement versus CFD

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Comparison of the time averaged relative total pressures downstream of the rotor (C-plane): measurement versus CFD

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Comparison of the streamlines predicted by the particle tracking tool UNS-TRACK with the predictions of TECPLOT

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Circumferentially mass averaged total temperature distributions for the hot streak and uniform temperature cases

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Map of distribution of the particles migrating to the rotor blade tip at the stator inlet (A-plane) with the total temperature distribution in the background

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Map of distribution of the particles migrating to the rotor blade tip at the stator inlet (A-plane) in the case of a uniform total temperature distribution

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Map of distributions of the particles migrating to the rotor blade tip at the stator inlet (A-plane); red particles in the case of the hot streak and white particles in the case of a uniform total temperature distribution

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Relative total pressure profiles imposed at the inlet of the rotor (B-plane)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Adiabatic wall temperatures at the rotor pressure and suction sides in the spanwise direction at 80% axial chord

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Radial position of the streamlines versus axial chord, the stator leading edge is at Cx=0.0 and the trailing edge at Cx=1.0

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Map of distribution of the particles migrating to the rotor blade tip downstream of the stator 1 (B-plane) with the calculated time averaged pitch angle distribution in the background

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Calculated pitch angle distribution at midspan and downstream of the stator 1 (B-plane) versus blade passing period

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 18

Measured pitch angle distribution at midspan and downstream of the stator 1 (B-plane) versus blade passing period

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 19

Total temperature distributions upstream of the stator 1 (A-plane) for different clocking positions of the hot streak: (a) 2%, (b) 6%, (c) 10%, and (d) −6% (toward suction side)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 20

Circumferentially mass averaged total temperature profiles upstream of the stator 1 (A-plane) for different clocking positions of the hot streak

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 21

Circumferentially mass averaged total temperature distributions downstream of the stator 1 (B-plane) for different clocking positions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 22

Time averaged adiabatic wall temperature differences between the clocked hot streaks and the baseline: (a) 2%, (b) 6%, (c) 10%, and (d) −6% (toward suction side)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 23

Time averaged adiabatic wall temperatures at the camber line of the rotor blade tip for different clocking positions of the hot streak

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In