0
Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Soot Modeling for Advanced Control of Diesel Engine Aftertreatment

[+] Author and Article Information
V. Mulone1

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rome Tor Vergata, via del Politecnico1, 00133 Rome, Italy; Fulbright Research Scholar, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering ESB, College of Engineering and Mineral Resources,  West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6106 e-mail: vincenzo.mulone@mail.wvu.edu, mulone@ing.uniroma2.it

A. Cozzolini

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering ESB, College of Engineering and Mineral Resources,  West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6106alessandro.cozzolini@mail.wvu.edu

P. Abeyratne

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering ESB, College of Engineering and Mineral Resources,  West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6106aeroshana@yahoo.com

D. Littera

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering ESB, College of Engineering and Mineral Resources,  West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6106daniele.littera@mail.wvu.edu

M. Thiagarajan

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering ESB, College of Engineering and Mineral Resources,  West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6106manoharan.thiagarajan@mail.wvu.edu

M. C. Besch

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering ESB, College of Engineering and Mineral Resources,  West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6106marc.besch@mail.wvu.edu

M. Gautam1

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering ESB, College of Engineering and Mineral Resources,  West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6106mridul.gautam@mail.wvu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 133(12), 122804 (Aug 31, 2011) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003958 History: Received November 15, 2010; Revised December 02, 2010; Published August 31, 2011; Online August 31, 2011

Diesel particulate filters (DPFs) are well assessed aftertreatment devices, equipping almost every modern diesel engine on the market to comply with today’s stringent emission standards. However, an accurate estimation of soot loading, which is instrumental to ensuring optimal performance of the whole engine-after-treatment assembly, is still a major challenge. In fact, several highly coupled physical-chemical phenomena occur at the same time, and a vast number of engine and exhaust dependent parameters make this task even more daunting. This challenge may be solved with models characterized by different degrees of detail (0-D to 3-D) depending on the specific application. However, the use of real-time, but accurate enough models, may be the primary hurdle that has to be overcome when confronted with advanced exhaust emissions control challenges, such as the integration of the DPF with the engine or other critical aftertreatment components (selective catalytic reduction or other NOx control components), or to properly develop model-based OBD sensors. This paper aims at addressing real time DPF modeling issues with special regard to key parameter settings, by using the 1-D code called ExhAUST (exhaust aftertreatment unified simulation tool), which was jointly developed by the University of Rome Tor Vergata and West Virginia University. ExhAUST is characterized by a novel and unique full analytical treatment of the wall that allows a highly detailed representation of the soot loading evolution inside the DPF porous matrix. Numerical results are compared with experimental data gathered at West Virginia University engine laboratory using a MY2004 Mack® MP7-355E, an 11 liter, 6-cylinder, inline heavy-duty diesel engine coupled to a Johnson Matthey CCRT diesel oxidation catalyst + CDPF, catalyzed DPF exhaust aftertreatment system. To that aim, the engine test bench was equipped with a DPF weighing system to track soot loading over a specifically developed engine operating procedure. Results indicate that the model is accurate enough to capture soot loading and back pressure histories with regard to different steady state engine operating points, without a need for any tuning procedure of the key parameters. Thus, the use of ExhAUST for application to advanced after-treatment control appears to be a promising tool at this stage.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Differential pressure versus time for regeneration (R100) and soot loading (R10) modes

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Differential pressure versus time for regeneration (R100) mode

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Differential pressure versus time for soot loading (R10) mode

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Schematic of the particle deposition on filter channels

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic of the ExhAUST structure for CCRT modeling

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Schematic of experimental setup at EERL (WVU)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Average particle size distribution: (left) 1800 rpm, 10% load (R10); (right) 1800 rpm, 100% load (R100)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

PM mass versus time for regeneration mode

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Washcoat and cake thickness over time for regeneration mode (R100)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Cake layer thickness over time for 30 h loading mode (R10)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Wall permeability versus wall thickness for regeneration mode (R100)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Wall permeability versus wall thickness for 30 h loading mode (R10)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Equivalent soot thickness per unit length over washcoat and wall

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Block diagram of the proposed control strategy

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

PM mass versus time for regeneration (R100) and soot loading (R10) modes

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

PM mass versus time for 30h loading mode

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In