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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

The Influence of Crystal Orientation on the Elastic Stresses of a Single Crystal Nickel-Based Turbine Blade

[+] Author and Article Information
Michael W. R. Savage

 Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd., Lincoln, LN5 7FD UK e-mail: mike.savage@siemens.com

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 134(1), 012501 (Oct 27, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004129 History: Received April 11, 2011; Revised April 26, 2011; Published October 27, 2011; Online October 27, 2011

Single crystal nickel-based turbine blades are directionally solidified during the casting process with the crystallographic direction [001] aligned with the blade stacking axis. This alignment is usually controlled within 10 deg, known as the Primary angle. The rotation of the single crystal about the [001] axis is generally not controlled and this is known as the Secondary angle. The variation in Primary and Secondary angles relative to the blade geometry means that the stress response from blade to blade will be different, even for the same loading conditions. This paper investigates the influence of single crystal orientation on the elastic stresses of a CMSX-4 turbine blade root attachment using finite element analysis. The results demonstrate an appreciable variation in elastic stress when analyzed over the controlled Primary angle, and are further compounded by the uncontrolled Secondary angle. The maximum stress range will have a direct impact on the fatigue resistance of the turbine blade. By optimizing the Secondary angle variation the elastic stresses can be reduced, giving the potential to enhance the fatigue resistance of the turbine blade.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

A turbine blade showing the Primary axis located within the limits defined by an imaginary cone

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Figure 2

Eulerian angles involving three rotations

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Figure 3

Test specimen showing the alignment of the single crystal Primary axis

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Figure 4

Finite element model of the turbine blade and disk sector

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Figure 5

Normalized maximum principal stress distribution of the blade root suction side

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Figure 6

Plan view of the turbine blade illustrating the Primary axis locations at two Primary angles 5 deg and 10 deg

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Figure 7

Variation in normalized von Mises stress against angle φ for Primary angles of 0 deg, 5 deg, and 10 deg (Secondary angle is 0 deg)

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Figure 8

Contour plot showing the influence of the Primary angle and axis location on normalized von Mises stress

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Figure 9

Variation in normalized von Mises stress against Secondary angle ψ for a Primary angle of 0 deg and 10 deg. Different Primary axis locations are shown for a Primary angle of 10 deg.

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Figure 10

Contour plot showing the influence of the Secondary angle on normalized von Mises stress when the Primary angle is 0 deg

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Figure 11

Contour plot showing the influence of the Secondary angle on normalized von Mises stress when the Primary angle is 10 deg

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