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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

Subgrid Scale Combustion Modeling Based on Stochastic Model Parameterization

[+] Author and Article Information
William H. Calhoon, Andrea C. Zambon, Balu Sekar, Barry Kiel

 Combustion Research and Flow Technology, Inc., (CRAFT Tech), Huntsville, AL 35802 and Pipersville, PA 18947 Air Force Research Lab, AFRL/RZTC Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 134(3), 031505 (Jan 03, 2012) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004254 History: Received April 08, 2011; Revised May 05, 2011; Published January 03, 2012; Online January 03, 2012

A new modeling formulation for turbulent chemistry interactions in large-eddy simulation (LES) is presented that is based on a unique application of the linear-eddy model (LEM) that includes large scale strain effects. This novel application of the LEM may be used to predict turbulent flame extinction limits due to both small and large scale strain effects. Statistics from this modeling formulation may be used to generate an inexpensive run-time model for LES predictions. This paper presents the LEM modeling formulation and demonstrates the capabilities of the approach for augmenter conditions. A methodology is also presented for formulating an LES-linear-eddy model (LES-LEM) subgrid model based on the simulation data.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Instantaneous temperature profiles for a turbulent counter flow flame at ReL  = 50 and 〈a〉 = 3695 s−1

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Figure 2

Mean axial velocity as a function of strain rate at ReL  = 50

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Figure 3

Mean temperature variation with strain rate plotted as a function of x at ReL  = 50

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Figure 4

Mean temperature variation with strain rate plotted as a function of x/L at ReL  = 50

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Figure 5

Mean CO2 mass fraction variation with strain rate plotted as a function of x/L at ReL  = 50

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Figure 6

Mean O mass fraction variation with strain rate plotted as a function of x/L at ReL  = 50

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Figure 7

Mean OH mass fraction variation with strain rate plotted as a function of x/L at ReL  = 50

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Figure 8

OH mass fraction variation with strain rate plotted as a function of x for laminar flow

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Figure 9

Mean temperature variation with ReL plotted as a function of x/L at 〈a〉 = 1056 1/s

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Figure 10

Mean CO2 mass fraction variation with ReL plotted as a function of x/L at 〈a〉 = 1056 1/s

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Figure 11

Mean O mass fraction variation with ReL plotted as a function of x/L at 〈a〉 = 1056 1/s

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Figure 12

Mean OH mass fraction variation with ReL plotted as a function of x/L at 〈a〉 = 1056 1/s

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Figure 13

Mixture fraction fluctuation as a function of x/L at 〈a〉 = 1056 1/s

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Figure 14

Mean CO2 mass fraction variation as a function of mixture fraction and Reynolds number at 〈a〉 = 1056 1/s

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Figure 15

Mean OH mass fraction variation as a function of mixture fraction and Reynolds number at 〈a〉 = 1056 1/s

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Figure 16

Mean CO2 mass fraction as a function of mixture fraction and mean strain rate at ReL  = 50

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Figure 17

Mean OH mass fraction as a function of mixture fraction and mean strain rate at ReL  = 50

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