0
Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Impact of Manufacturing Variability and Nonaxisymmetry on High-Pressure Compressor Stage Performance

[+] Author and Article Information
Alexander Lange

Technische  Universität Dresden, Institute of Fluid Mechanics, D-01062 Dresden, Germanyalexander.lange@tu-dresden.de Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG, Compressor Aerodynamics, D-15827 Blankenfelde-Mahlow, Dahlewitz, Germanyalexander.lange@tu-dresden.de

Matthias Voigt, Konrad Vogeler, Henner Schrapp, Erik Johann, Volker Gümmer

Technische  Universität Dresden, Institute of Fluid Mechanics, D-01062 Dresden, Germany Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG, Compressor Aerodynamics, D-15827 Blankenfelde-Mahlow, Dahlewitz, Germany

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 134(3), 032504 (Jan 03, 2012) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004404 History: Received May 02, 2011; Revised June 03, 2011; Published January 03, 2012; Online January 03, 2012

This paper introduces an approach for considering manufacturing variability leading to a nonaxisymmetric blading in the computational fluid dynamics simulation of a high-pressure compressor stage. A set of 150 rotor blades from a high-pressure compressor stage was 3D scanned in order to obtain the manufacturing variability. The obtained point clouds were parameterized using a parametric blade model, which uses typical profile parameters to translate the geometric variability into a numerical model. Probabilistic simulation methods allow for the generation of a sampled set of blades that statistically corresponds to the measured one. This technique was applied to generate 4000 sampled blades in order to investigate the influence of a nonaxisymmetric blading. It was found that the aerodynamic performance is considerably influenced by a variation of the passage cross section. Nevertheless, this influence decreases with an increasing number of independently sampled blades and, thus, independently shaped passage cross sections. Due to its more accurate consideration of the geometric variability, the presented methodology allows for a more realistic performance analysis of a high-pressure compressor stage.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

1.5 HPC stage model with eight individual rotor passages

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Relative Mach number at 75% span

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Geometry of a sampled two-passage model with reasonable change in the passage cross section

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

3D pressure field of one realization

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Histogram of isentropic efficiency for one-, two-, four-, and eight-passage calculations

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Ant-hill plot of isentropic efficiency versus total pressure loss for one-, two-, four-, and eight-passage calculations

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Comparison of the relative Mach number versus the circumferential coordinate at 75% span and 30% chord

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Static pressure of rotor of realization 455 at 75% span

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Comparison of the pressure coefficient between single-passage and two-passage models at 75% span

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Standard deviation of the static pressure field at 75% span

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Correlation between static pressure field and maximum camber at 75% span

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Correlation between static pressure field and fillet thickness at 5% span

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Approximation of standard deviation ratio

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Mean value shift

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Scatter range extrapolation for isentropic efficiency

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In