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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Air System and Diesel Combustion Modeling for Hardware in the Loop Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Jean-Baptiste Millet1

Laboratoire d’Ingénierie des Systèmes de Versailles,  University of Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, 10-12 Avenue de l’Europe, 78140 Vélizy Villacoublay, Francejean-baptiste.millet@iut-velizy.uvsq.fr

Fadila Maroteaux

Laboratoire d’Ingénierie des Systèmes de Versailles,  University of Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, 10-12 Avenue de l’Europe, 78140 Vélizy Villacoublay, France

Fabrice Aubertin

Robert Bosch France, 32 Avenue Michelet, 93400 Saint-Ouen, Francefabrice.aubertin@fr.bosch.com

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 134(4), 042802 (Jan 27, 2012) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004597 History: Received September 13, 2010; Revised July 04, 2011; Published January 27, 2012; Online January 27, 2012

The development of engine control unit (ECU) systems for series production requires an important validation phase. In order to reduce the number of time consuming and expensive vehicle tests, the ECU is validated using hardware in the loop (HIL) test bench. The HIL simulates the engine behavior in real-time simulations to generate consistent sensor values for all engine operating points, e.g., starting phase, transient behavior, static behavior, etc. Mean value engine models (MVEM) are able to run in real time and are appropriate for HIL test systems. In this paper we present a full MVEM taking into account all engine components: air system (air filter, turbocharger, charge air cooler, throttle valve, intake and exhaust manifolds, EGR valve, and turbine), oxidation catalyst (OxiCat), and diesel particulate filter (DPF). Additionally, combustion models have been developed to simulate the influence of the injection strategies (pre, main, post, and late injections) on the exhaust temperature and the unburned hydrocarbon emission (HC). These are taken into consideration in the exothermal reactions models inside OxiCat and DPF. The results show that the model prediction in term of pressure and temperature are in good agreement with the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) project data. The after treatment temperature evolutions in the OxiCat and DPF are well reproduced by the proposed model.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Engine schematic view

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Figure 2

Schematic view of the model air path with Simulink representation

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Figure 3

Test bench and its environment

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Figure 4

Comparison between measured and simulated intake manifold pressure (static validation)

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Figure 5

Comparison between measured and simulated temperature intake manifold (static validation)

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Figure 6

Comparison between measured and simulated pressure at turbine inlet (static validation)

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Figure 7

Comparison between measured and simulated temperature at turbine inlet (static validation)

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Figure 8

Comparison between measured and simulated air mass flow at turbine inlet (static validation)

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Figure 9

European driving cycle or NEDC

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Figure 10

Comparison between vehicle data (dashed line) and HIL (full line)

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Figure 11

Comparison between HIL simulation test without failure (dashed line) and with failure (full line)

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Figure 12

Overheating engine simulation

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Figure 13

Regeneration mode simulation

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