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Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Numerical-Experimental Comparison in the Simulation of Rotor/Stator Interaction Through Blade-Tip/Abradable Coating Contact

[+] Author and Article Information
Alain Batailly

Structural Dynamics and Vibration Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering,  McGill University, 817 Sherbrooke St. West, Montréal, Québec, H3A 2K6, Canadaalain.batailly@mcgill.ca

Mathias Legrand

Structural Dynamics and Vibration Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering,  McGill University, 817 Sherbrooke St. West, Montréal, Québec, H3A 2K6, Canadamathias.legrand@mcgill.ca

Antoine Millecamps, François Garcin

Snecma, site de Villaroche, Moissy-Cramayel, 77550, France

An engine order is defined by the linear relation f = kfΩ , k being an integer.

Stresses are computed from the displacements field using the Samcef software. Two types of stresses are considered in this paper: the radial and the von Mises stresses calculated as mean stresses (one value per element).

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 134(8), 082504 (Jun 29, 2012) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006446 History: Received January 04, 2012; Revised March 12, 2012; Published June 29, 2012; Online June 29, 2012

Higher aircraft energy efficiency may be achieved by minimizing the clearance between the rotating blade tips and respective surrounding casing. A common technical solution consists in the implementation of an abradable liner which improves both the operational safety and the efficiency of modern turbomachines. However, unexpected abradable wear removal mechanisms were recently observed in experimental set-ups as well as during maintenance procedures. Based on a numerical strategy previously developed, the present study introduces a numerical-experimental comparison of such occurrence. Attention is first paid to the review and analysis of existing experimental results. Good agreement with numerical predictions is then illustrated in terms of critical stress levels within the blade as well as final wear profiles of the abradable liner. Numerical results suggest an alteration of the abradable mechanical properties in order to explain the outbreak of a divergent interaction. New blade designs are also explored in this respect and it is found that the interaction phenomenon is highly sensitive to (1) the blade geometry, (2) the abradable material properties, and (3) the distortion of the casing.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Cut-view of an aircraft engine with sensitive contact areas

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Figure 2

Blade of interest

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Figure 3

Rotation speed during the experimental run

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Figure 4

Radial stress in the middle of the blade during the experimental run

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Figure 5

Radial stress in the middle of the blade during the first phase of the interaction

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Figure 6

Radial stress in the middle of the blade during the fifth phase of the interaction

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Figure 7

Wear of the abradable coating measured after the experimental run

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Figure 8

Schematic of the blade after the test (the damages visible on the tip of the blade on the trailing edge are not associated with the interaction phenomenon of interest in our study)

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Figure 9

Blade finite element model

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Figure 10

Superimposition of the Campbell diagrams of the reduced order model (+) and the finite element model (o). All frequencies are normalized with respect to the first eigenfrequency of the blade at rest.

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Figure 11

Blade interface node and associated geometrical profile

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Figure 12

Plasticity constitutive law

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Figure 13

Amplitude of casing ovalization

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Figure 14

Tangential displacement of the contact node at the trailing edge

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Figure 15

von Mises stress in element 1982 versus the first two revolutions of the blade following the first blade-tip/abradable contact

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Figure 16

Radial stress in the middle of the blade (element 1982) during phase 1

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Figure 17

Radial stress in the middle of the blade (element 1982) during phase 2

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Figure 18

von Mises stress in blade root (element 6455) during phase 2

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Figure 19

von Mises stress field for t = 7.45 TΩ,int*

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Figure 20

Wear of the abradable coating computed with numerical simulations

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Figure 21

Tangential displacement of the contact node at the trailing edge; sudden alteration of the Young’s modulus (foreground) and reference solution (background)

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Figure 22

Abradable coating removal at the trailing edge after 100 revolutions; alteration of the Young’s modulus (dashed line) and reference solution (solid line)

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Figure 23

Blade design evolutions superimposed to the reference design

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Figure 24

Maps of worn lobes at the trailing edge for different blade geometry

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