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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

1D Engine Simulation of a Small HSDI Diesel Engine Applying a Predictive Combustion Model

[+] Author and Article Information
T. Cerri

Department of Energetics, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20158 Milano, Italytarcisio.cerri@polimi.it

A. Onorati

Department of Energetics, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20158 Milano, Italyangelo.onorati@polimi.it

E. Mattarelli

Department of Mechanical and Civil Engineering, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena, Italymattarelli.enrico@unimore.it

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 130(1), 012802 (Dec 26, 2007) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2747258 History: Received May 26, 2006; Revised April 11, 2007; Published December 26, 2007

The paper analyzes the operations of a small high speed direct injection (HSDI) turbocharged diesel engine by means of a parallel experimental and computational investigation. As far as the numerical approach is concerned, an in-house 1D research code for the simulation of the whole engine system has been enhanced by the introduction of a multizone quasi-dimensional combustion model, tailored for multijet direct injection diesel engines. This model takes into account the most relevant issues of the combustion process: spray development, air-fuel mixing, ignition, and formation of the main pollutant species (nitrogen oxide and particulate). The prediction of the spray basic patterns requires previous knowledge of the fuel injection rate. Since the direct measure of this quantity at each operating condition is not a very practical proceeding, an empirical model has been developed in order to provide reasonably accurate injection laws from a few experimental characteristic curves. The results of the simulation at full load are compared to experiments, showing a good agreement on brake performance and emissions. Furthermore, the combustion model tuned at full load has been applied to the analysis of some operating conditions at partial load, without any change to the calibration parameters. Still, the numerical simulation provided results that qualitatively agree with experiments.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 7

Comparison between predicted and measured IMEP of the HSDI turbocharged diesel engine, as a function of the engine speed at full load

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Figure 1

Picture of the HSDI turbocharged diesel engine investigated (FIAT 1.25L multijet)

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Figure 2

Schematic of the fuel spray structure

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Figure 3

Schematic of the fuel spray: jet formation after wall collision

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Figure 4

(a) Cylinder wall collision, (b) piston bowl wall collision, and (c) impact with piston crown

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Figure 5

Comparison of experimental and model results at the rail pressure of 160MPa and energizing time of 0.8ms

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Figure 6

Comparison of experimental and model results at the rail pressure of 120MPa and energizing time of 0.24ms

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Figure 8

Comparison between predicted and measured air mass flow rates, as a function of engine speed at full load

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Figure 9

Comparison between predicted and measured compressor boost pressure as a function of engine speed at full load

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Figure 10

Comparison between measured and predicted in-cylinder pressure at full load and different speeds: (a) 1500rpm, (b) 2000rpm, (c) 3000rpm, and (d) 4000rpm

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Figure 11

Comparison between measured and predicted rate of heat release at full load and different speeds: (a) 1500rpm, (b) 2000rpm, (c) 3000rpm, and (d) 4000rpm

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Figure 12

Comparison between predicted and measured NO emissions as a function of engine speed at full load

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Figure 13

Comparison between predicted and measured soot emissions as a function of engine speed at full load

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Figure 18

Comparison between predicted and measured soot emissions, as a function of the engine speed at partial load (BMEP=0.6MPa)

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Figure 14

Comparison between predicted and measured BSFC as a function of engine speed at full load

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Figure 15

Comparison between calculated in-cylinder pressure and rate of heat release, at four engine speeds, partial load (BMEP=0.6MPa). 3D results are obtained by KIVA-3V simulations.

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Figure 16

Comparison between predicted and measured BSFC, as a function of engine speed at partial load (BMEP=0.6MPa)

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Figure 17

Comparison between predicted and measured NO emissions, as a function of engine speed at partial load (BMEP=0.6MPa)

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