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Research Papers: Internal Combustion Engines

Application of a Spark Ignition Engine Simulation Tool for Alternative Fuels

[+] Author and Article Information
Nirendra N. Mustafi

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand

Robert R. Raine

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealandr.raine@auckland.ac.nz

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 130(1), 012804 (Jan 09, 2008) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2747264 History: Received November 09, 2006; Revised April 17, 2007; Published January 09, 2008

Investigations on alternative fuels for internal combustion engines are regarded as one of the major research areas for the age. Engine simulation tools can play an important role in such investigations without performing the experimental works. It usually saves both time and money and provides better and additional understanding where the experimental facilities are limited. A spark ignition (SI) engine simulation tool (ISIS) is used in this present study to simulate the performance and emissions of SI engines, operated on alternative fuels such as biogas and “Powergas” (a synthesis gaseous fuel mixture of mainly carbon monoxide and hydrogen). An extended investigation is done for the oxides of nitrogen emissions considering multiple burn zones. The results are verified against those obtained for engine torque/brake power, exhaust temperature, and exhaust emissions experimentally and a good agreement is found between them.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Experimental and simulation results. (a) Brake power, (b) exhaust temperature, as a function of Φ for methane/NG and biogas fuels at 2350rpm, WOT, and MBT spark timing.

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Figure 2

Experimental and simulation results in NOx emissions, as a function of Φ for methane/NG and biogas fuels at 2350rpm, WOT, and MBT spark timing

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Figure 3

Experimental and simulation results in CO emissions, as a function of Φ for methane/NG and biogas fuels at 2350rpm, WOT, and MBT spark timing

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Figure 4

Comparison of simulation results with experiment for engine brake torque (at 1500rpm, MBT and WOT and at a CR of 8:1) for different fuels

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Figure 5

Exhaust CO2, CO, and O2 emissions for “Powergas” as a function of equivalence ratio (at 1500rpm, MBT, and WOT and at a CR of 8:1)

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Figure 6

Exhaust NOx emissions as a function equivalence ratio (at 1500rpm, MBT, and WOT and at a CR of 8:1)

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Figure 7

Results from 5-burned zones model showing: burned gas temperatures (Tb), and kinetic NOx and equilibrium (NOe) nitric oxide concentrations as a function of crank angle for the first and fifth zones at Φ=0.79; Fuel: “Powergas”

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Figure 8

Results from 5-burned zones model showing: burned gas temperatures (Tb), and kinetic NOx and equilibrium (NOe) nitric oxide concentrations as a function of crank angle for the first and fifth zones at Φ=0.99; Fuel: “Powergas”

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Figure 9

Results from 5-burned zones model showing: Tb, and kinetic and equilibrium (NOe) nitric oxides concentrations as a function of CA for the first and fifth zones (fuel: natural gas at Φ=1.0)

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