0
Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Combustion, Fuels, and Emissions

The Effect of Liquid-Fuel Preparation on Gas Turbine Emissions

[+] Author and Article Information
Sosuke Nakamura1

UCI Combustion Laboratory, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3550

Vince McDonell, Scott Samuelsen

UCI Combustion Laboratory, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3550

1

Visiting Scientist, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Hyogo, Japan.

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 130(2), 021506 (Feb 29, 2008) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2771564 History: Received October 31, 2006; Revised October 31, 2006; Published February 29, 2008

The emissions of liquid-fuel fired gas turbine engines are strongly affected by the fuel preparation process that includes atomization, evaporation, and mixing. In the present paper, the effects of fuel atomization and evaporation on emissions from an industrial gas turbine engine were investigated. In the engine studied, the fuel injector consists of a coaxial plain jet airblast atomizer and a premixer which consists of a cylindrical tube with four mixing holes and swirler slits. The goal of this device is to establish a fully vaporized, homogeneous fuel/air mixture for introduction into the combustion chamber and the reaction zone. In the present study, experiments were conducted at atmospheric pressure and room temperature as well as at actual engine conditions (0.34MPa, 740K) both with and without the premixer. Measurements included visualization, droplet size, and velocity. By conducting tests with and without the premixing section, the effect of the mixing holes and swirler slit design on atomization and evaporation was isolated. The results were also compared with engine data and the relationship between premixer performance and emissions was evaluated. By comparing the results of tests over a range of pressures, the viability of two scaling methods was evaluated with the conclusion that spray angle correlates with fuel to atomizing air momentum ratio. For the injector studied, however, the conditions resulting in superior atomization and vaporization did not translate into superior emissions performance. This suggests that, while atomization and the evaporation of the fuel are important in the fuel preparation process, they are of secondary importance to the fuel/air mixing prior to, and in the early stages of the reaction in, governing emissions.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Liquid atomizer/premixer assembly

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Capstone C30 microturbine generator

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

High-pressure facility

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Atomizer/premixer assembly

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Injector without premixer tube

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Pressure vessel internal airflow schematic

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Cross section at optical access height

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Emission versus load output

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Effects of nonuniform fuel and air mixing on NOx formation

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Symmetry assessment and uncertainty of spray measurement

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Time averaged and short exposure laser sheet scattering images at the exit of premixer for actual engine condition cases (fuel flow rate=0.053kg∕min, P=0.34MPa, T=740K)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Digital camera and time averaged laser sheet scattering images of the spray plume for actual engine condition cases (fuel flow rate=0.053kg∕min, P=0.34MPa, T=740K)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Radial profiles of D32 for actual engine condition cases

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Radial profiles of volume flux for actual engine condition cases

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Velocity vectors in R-Z plane for actual engine condition cases

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Emission versus ALR at 100% load

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Recirculation zone downstream of the premixer

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 18

Digital camera images at the exit of atomizer for Strategy 1 at different pressure (0.1–0.9MPa)300K cases

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 19

Digital camera images at the exit of atomizer for Strategy 2 at different pressure (0.1–0.7MPa)300K cases

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 20

Typical image of spray angle measurement technique

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 21

Spray angle measured downstream of the atomizer as a function of fuel to air momentum ratio

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 22

Radial profiles of D32 for Strategy 1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 23

Radial profile of D32 for Strategy 2

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In