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Research Papers: Gas Turbines: Structures and Dynamics

Robust Strategies for Forced Response Reduction of Bladed Disks Based on Large Mistuning Concept

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Nikolic

Mechanical Engineering Department, Centre of Vibration Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ, UKmarija.nikolic@imperial.ac.uk

E. P. Petrov

Mechanical Engineering Department, Centre of Vibration Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ, UKy.petrov@imperial.ac.uk

D. J. Ewins

Mechanical Engineering Department, Centre of Vibration Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ, UKd.ewins@imperial.ac.uk

J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 130(2), 022501 (Jan 22, 2008) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2799524 History: Received April 26, 2007; Revised June 08, 2007; Published January 22, 2008

In this paper, robust maximum forced response reduction strategies based on a “large mistuning” concept are introduced, including both (i) random and (ii) deterministic approaches. An industrial bladed fan disk serves as an application example for a reliability assessment of the aforementioned strategies using two well-established tools for uncertainty analysis: (i) statistics and (ii) sensitivity and robustness. The feasibility and other practical aspects of implementing large mistuning as a means of preventing excessive forced response levels caused by random mistuning and ensuring the predictability of the response are discussed.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Disks , Blades , Robustness
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Forced response amplification factor as a function of blade frequency mistuning range

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Figure 2

Bladed fan disk: (a) full model and (b) its cyclic sector

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Figure 3

Natural frequencies of a tuned bladed fan disk, the excitation frequency range (rectangular area between two dashed horizontal lines), and analyzed excitation EOs (vertical lines)

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Figure 4

Uniform PDF of frequency mistuning range

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Figure 5

“Active” and “passive” nodes

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Figure 6

Forced response results for ±40%, 15%, and 0.5% frequency mistuning ranges obtained for (a) 3 EO, (b) 6 EO and (c) 13 EO

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Figure 7

Forced response results obtained under 3 EO for (a) ±1.5%, 1%, and 0.5%, (b) ±15%, 10%, and 5%, and (c) ±40%, 30%, and 20% frequency mistuning ranges

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Figure 8

Maximum, minimum, and mean forced response results for (a) ±0.5% and (b) ±40% frequency mistuning ranges obtained for 3 EO

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Figure 9

Maximum, minimum, and mean forced response results for 3, 6, and 13 EO

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Figure 10

FRFs for all blades under 3 EO excitation for (a) ±0.1%, (b) ±2%, and (c) ±20% frequency mistuning ranges

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Figure 11

Forced response statistical results for ±0.5% frequency mistuning range. Different solid-line colors denote the hypothetical theoretical distribution functions.

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Figure 12

Forced response statistical results for ±15% frequency mistuning range

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Figure 13

Forced response statistical results for ±40% frequency mistuning range

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Figure 14

Forced response results for deterministically defined (a) alternate, (b) harmonic, (c) linear mistuning patterns, and (d) those with few “damaged” blades

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